The Catholic Worker Movement

Dorothy Day's writings from 1960 to 1969

1960 | 1961 |1962 | 1963 | 1964 | 1965 | 1966 | 1967 | 1968 | 1969 |

1960 January

"Letter to an Imprisoned Editor" (DDLW #760)
Summary: Notes that several editors of the Catholic Worker have been jailed for their beliefs and work for non-violence. A dialogue by letter with Ammon Hennacy who is in jail. Discussion of cooperatives and collectives in Spain, Cuba, China, and Israel.

1960 February

"On Pilgrimage - February 1960" (DDLW #761)
Shares reactions to an article by Thomas Merton and a biography of Charles de Foucauld. Notes we have hardly begun to understand the gospels. Tells stories of feeling fear and the senseless cold war. Tells of the work of religious and lay groups in Minnesota. Says "we need to pray for vocations, all kinds of vocations."

1960 March

"On Pilgrimage - March 1960" (DDLW #762)
Describes her travel tips on a journey to Chicago. Visits her childhood street and reminisces on their poverty, learning to pray, and her vocation to poverty. Tells of a picket line in support of a tax resister and defends their use of the name Catholic.

1960 April

"On Pilgrimage - April 1960" (DDLW #763)
Diary-like account of a journey through Minnesota, South Dakota, Oregon, and into Canada telling of the work being done by the people she visits. Admires the life and beliefs of the Doukhobars group, a seventeenth century Russian sect dedicated to non-violence and simple Christian living.

1960 May

"On Pilgrimage - May 1960" (DDLW #764)
Describes a speaking trip to Vancouver, Oregon, and San Francisco. Admires the varied apostolic works of the people she visits as examples of service to the common good.

1960 June

"On Pilgrimage - June 1960" (DDLW #765)
Comments on not being arrested at the annual civil disobedience against New York City's air raid drills. Visits Tamar in Vermont. Continues her account of a West Coast trip focusing on the farm labor situation there.

1960 July

"Reflections On The Connection" (DDLW #766)
Focuses on drug addiction which she first encountered in prison. Attends a performance of the play "The Connection" about drug addicts. Lauds the play and reiterates Peter's vision of building a society where it is easier to be good. Says we cannot change people.

1960 July

"On Pilgrimage - July/August 1960" (DDLW #949)
Explains the lack of a full column due to the birth of her latest granddaughter.

1960 July

"Friday Night Meeting" (DDLW #767)
Notes of a Friday night meeting with artist Fritz Eichenberg on modern art, much of which he sees as junk and dehumanizing. Eichenberg says going back to crafts will restore creativeness.

1960 September

"This Money is Not Ours" (DDLW #768)
Explains their position on usury and derides the profit system. Says they try to withdraw from "THE SYSTEM" by following Matthew 25. Keywords: work

1960 September

"Jonas Visits Peter Maurin Farm" (DDLW #770)
A tribute to a hard working and sometimes problematic Lituanian guest at Peter Maurin Farm. Quotes his recitation of his life of hard works and worries about a pension. "Here is a man who has worked hard all his life, who lives in poverty but is not destitute, and is always cheerful and ready to serve; we all love him."

1960 September

"On Pilgrimage - September 1960" (DDLW #769)
Stops to see friends in Vermont on her way to a retreat in Montreal. Mentions books and machines for village economics and home industries. Recounts visiting folks on her last trip west and a miracle of an infant with polio. She delights in everyone's practice of the works of mercy.

1960 October

"Khrushchev And Alexander Nevsky" (DDLW #771)
Retells the non-violent efforts of the 13th Century Russian hero Alexander Nevsky with the Mongol invaders. Notes the parallel to the new United Nations where East and West try to avoid atomic war where there are no victors. Urges the study of history. Keywords: books, Russia, prayer

1960 October

"Fall Appeal - October 1960" (DDLW #772)
Says they are "broke again and are beggars." Lists their expenses and improvements that were needed in city and farm on Staten Island. Recalls Saints Paul, Joseph ("the householder"), Francis, and Therese.

1960 November

"Eviction--Suffering" (DDLW #773)
Notes the sufferings of victims of urban renewal and is cynical of those who benefit.

1960 November

"On Pilgrimage - November 1960" (DDLW #775)
Notes visitors and correspondence. Responds to letters of criticism of their returning interest to the city (see Doc # 776). Says they are propagandists for principles, trying by gestures to work out truths of faith, a spiritual weapon. Visits Tamar in Vermont and describes how the children help. Lauds self-sufficiency on the land.

1960 November

"Letters: From the City to Us. From Us to the City" (DDLW #776)
When the city says it will use interest money they returned to acquire more property, she responds by asking that they give it to WNYC radio "which provides such joy to so many." (See Doc #775)

1960 December

"On Pilgrimage - December 1960" (DDLW #774)
Vignettes about gardens, movies, readings, tributes to helpful police, speaking trips, a visit to Tamar in Vermont, and her grandchildren's hunting exploits. Reiterates Peter Maurin's program of cult, culture, and cultivation. Distinguishes between poverty and destitution, natural and supernatural poverty.

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1961 January

"On Pilrimage - January 1961" (DDLW #777)
Sets our by car on a speaking journey on a bitter winter day, stopping along the way to visit families she knows. Admires their varied work, with severely brain-damaged children, teaching and writing, work on the land, and efforts with the elderly. Visits the town in Illinois where the Mormons started and admires their personal responsibility for each other, common work for the common good, and not accepting government aid.

1961 February

"On Pilgrimage - February 1961" (DDLW #778)
Continues her car journey with observations about the geography of New Orleans. Tells of a miracle attributed to Martin de Porres and speaks of an interest in folk medicine. Admires efforts of families living on the land and their efforts at community.

1961 March

"On Pilgrimage - March 1961" (DDLW #780)
Spends a week in Balmorhea, Texas, while her car is repaired. Describes the apostolic works in the area as well as the living and working conditions of poor cotton pickers. Says suffering is "the strongest of all the spiritual weapons."

1961 March

"Spring Appeal - March 1961" (DDLW #779)
Asks readers to "forgive the seventy times seven times we go on asking." Recalls biblical stories where people are fed in seemingly hopeless situations.

1961 April

"On Pilgrimage - April 1961" (DDLW #781)
Spends a few days in Arizona desert towns describing work being done with the Papago Indians and Mexican children.

1961 May

"On Pilgrimage - May 1961" (DDLW #782)
Amidst the turmoil of world happenings and the immediate demands of people, all the apostolic works must go on--picketing, going to jail, visiting the sick and the prisoner, speaking, writing, praying, cleaning, cooking. . . .

1961 June

"On Pilgrimage - June 1961" (DDLW #783)
Recounts with gratitude the donations they receive and notes how quickly they become poor again. Upbraids herself for giving advice instead of giving leeway to each worker. Doesn't like all the clutter but respects individual freedom. Travels to Detroit, then to visit Tamar in Vermont.

1961 July

"About Cuba" (DDLW #246)
Addresses the issue of supporting the Cuban revolution while the Church is being persecuted there. Reaffirms solidarity with the poor and is critical of clergy who ignore the poor. Affirms opposition to violent revolution and the ultimate triumph of good over evil.

1961 September

"On Pilgrimage - September 1961" (DDLW #784)
On a hot and humid August day she describes their neighborhood and the many visitors coming and going. Longs for the country and the beach. Mentions several Workers who participated in freedom rides in the South as part of the civil rights movement. Mentions several conferences on third-world development noting that "some kind of ownership which gives security" is needed in the U.S. as well as elsewhere.

1961 October

"On Pilgrimage - October 1961" (DDLW #786)
Bits of news of her upcoming speaking engagements and the activities of many workers--answering correspondence, leafleting in Moscow, and on retreat. Reflects on doing "the duties of our state in life" and the need for a sense of Divine Providence.

1961 October

"Appeal - October 1961" (DDLW #785)
With the bank account at one dollar and grocery bill to pay, she appeals for help. Says "I like writing an appeal when we literally have nothing."

1961 November

"On Pilgrimage - November 1961" (DDLW #787)
Laments that schools take up too much of children's time, depriving mothers "help from her community." Urges reading, especially the scriptures, the psalms in particular. Is encouraged that the encyclical Mater et Magistra encourages cooperatives. Thinks the U.S. policy toward Cuba is counterproductive.

1961 December

"On Pilgrimage - December 1961" (DDLW #788)
Citing recent violence against missionaries, she wonders if they are being prepared to face death. Ponders the meaning of self-defense and the need to combat fear. Keywords: non-violence, prison, jail

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1962 January

"On Pilgrimage - January 1962" (DDLW #789)
Remembers the joy that brought about her faith and is full of gratitude for the Mass. Reveling in the hustle and bustle at Tamar's house in Vermont, she recalls "God's goodness and the sacramentality of things." On a speaking trip through Pennsylvania she mentions several strikes and the problems of unemployed miners.

1962 February

"No On Pilgrimage" (DDLW #790)
Brief notice that her column will be missing while she works on a new book. Slips in an emergency appeal.

1962 May

Appeal - May 1962 (DDLW #931)
A semi-annual appeal for funds, noting their expenses for food, rend, and even burials. Says it's foolish, but calculates they've served 132,000 meals since the last appeal. Points to the widow who fed Elias when he begged and her reward.

1962 July

"On Pilgrimage - July/August 1962" (DDLW #792)
Mentions her travails in getting a new book about the Catholic Worker movement, Loaves and Fishes, ready for the publisher. Disapproves of the attitudes and behavior of "a group of beats" who came and went, especially their sexual behavior and disrespect for the body. Hopes to travel to Brazil and Cuba. Recommends reading Chekhov and numerous other books.

1962 July

"More About Cuba" (DDLW #247)
A response to critics who view the Catholic Worker as pro-Marxist-Leninist. Reflects on the Catholic Worker's role in the Church. Affirms the need to listen to the truth, whatever the source, and the need for spiritual weapons and nonviolent means to overcome evil.

1962 September

"The Council And The Mass" (DDLW #794)
On the eve of the beginning of Vatican Council II she pens a personal appreciation of the Mass and its role in her life and the meaning of participating in its celebration. She has harsh words for priests who mumble and rush through both English and Latin prayers at Mass.

1962 September

"Pilgrimage to Cuba--Part I" (DDLW #793)

Departs for Cuba to see for herself life under Castro's communism, especially farming communes, the life of the family, and religious freedom. Humorously comments on the 40 rules in fine print on her steamship ticket. Deflects critics who say she won't be truthful and see much. Reaffirms her pacifism even though Cuba "is an armed camp." " I will try to make the Cuban story come alive."

1962 October

"On Pilgrimage In Cuba--Part II" (DDLW #795)
Comments on the campaign to make everyone literate in Cuba and the impassioned style of Fidel Castro's oratory. Asserts that she found freedom of religion. Includes an extensive quote from Castro where he says one can be a revolutionist and a Catholic as long as anyone holds to the aims of the revolution and justice holding religious beliefs in his heart.

1962 November

"On Pilgrimage In Cuba: Part III" (DDLW #796)
Continues the account of her pilgrimage in Cuba with a story of getting lost on the bus system. Delivers supplies to the National Hospital. Stays with several families and visits collective farms. Admires many new homes going up, sturdy furniture, and pockets of free enterprise. Notes everyone's hunger for education. Describes Catholics who struggle with the language of the revolution but work for the common good in building up society. Sees similarities between Peter Maurin's philosophy of work and efforts to build up Cuban society.

1962 November

"On Pilgrimage to Cuba--Part IV" (DDLW #798)
Notes the fervor of the revolution in the wake of the missile crisis of October. Mentions the open seminaries and work of religious sisters, food shortages, friendly people, absence of drunkenness. When asked if she could find nothing wrong in Cuba she lists their many struggles.

1962 December

"Fall Appeal - December 1962" (DDLW #797)
Begs for help to pay rents and local taxes. Says their work is life-giving and "It is by prayer and alms that we do penance for our own sins and the sins of the world, and we can all give alms."

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1963 January

"On Pilgrimage - January 1963" (DDLW #799)
On a speaking trip, weary of Winter travel, she mentions the strong interest in Cuba and the social changes in Latin America among her listeners. Visits her family in Vermont and extols family life as the ordinary way of working for the common good. Observes a group of men who had made "a cursillo, a course in Christianity" praying together and asks all to pray for men joined together in love.

1963 February

"More About Cuba" (DDLW #800)
Rues the nationalism and waste of resources that continues in our relations with Cuba--"out next door brothers." Says she will continue to write in the light of faith about all that contributes to "a heartwarming zeal for the common good." Keywords: war, pacifism

1963 April

"On Pilgrimage - April 1963" (DDLW #801)
Complains about a litter-filled city park, wondering why the unemployed aren't put to work to beautify it. Receives a gift of Spanish language lessons and enjoys a visit to her daughter's family in Vermont. Eulogizes Joe Roach, a long-time resident at their farm--"Joe was another Lazarus."

1963 April

"Spring Appeal - April 1963" (DDLW #802)
Writing on the feast of St. Joseph, she focuses her appeal around Peter Maurin's call for a philosophy of work and gives examples of "faint beginnings" that illustrate his ideas.

1963 May

"On Pilgrimage - May 1963" (DDLW #803)
On a peace pilgrimage to Rome during Vatican Council II, she describes their accommodations, a bus tour, fellow pilgrims, visits to friends, and an audience with Pope John XXIII.

1963 June

"On Pilgrimage - June 1963" (DDLW #804)
Reports on John XXIII's last public appearance and words before his death and their earlier audience with him. In her meeting with Vatican officials she says she hopes the Council will discuss the morality of war and peace. ( DDLW #804.)

1963 July

"On Pilgrimage - July/August 1963" (DDLW #805)
Goes to Danville, Virginia, and describes the brutality of the police against demonstrators. Speaks at a spirited prayer meeting devoted to civil rights. Ties civil rights to education, jobs, health care, and averting war. Participates in picketing. Says, "We all have something to give." Notes the death of friends.

1963 September

"On Pilgrimage - September 1963" (DDLW #806)
With a busy summer over, she ruminates about family and second generation Catholic Workers. Reproves those who advocate sex without responsibility but extols "sex in its right order." Keywords: abortion

1963 October

"Fall Appeal - October 1963" (DDLW #807)
Reminds readers we are all responsible for each other--" Hold on to each other. We are each one responsible, one for another. We are all brothers."

1963 October

"On Pilgrimage - October 1963" (DDLW #808)
On a vacation and speaking trip in Italy, she admires the enthusiasm of young students and seminarians. Remarks on the life and conversion of Bill Congdon who acted as an interpreter for one of her talks. Visits Milan, Florence, Assisi, and takes a side trip to see Padre Pio.

1963 November

"On Pilgrimage - November 1963" (DDLW #809)
Stays with newly forming community of families while on a speaking trip to England and recalls Peter Maurin's agronomic vision and support for the family farm.

1963 December

"On Pilgriamge - December 1963" (DDLW #810)

Notes the assassination of President Kennedy. Says she wants to write a book about how the retreats of the 1940s strengthened her. Goes on to stress the need for spiritual training. Acknowledges Peter Maurin's influence on her.


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1964 January

"On Pilgrimage - January 1964" (DDLW #811)
Homey tales of a winter visit to her daughter, the story of two old guests, and their upcoming move to a new farm. Sums up their work as the works of mercy and the works of study.

1964 February

"On Pilgrimage - February 1964" (DDLW #812)
Reflects on voluntary poverty against the backdrop of stories of theft and being taken advantage of by guests. Asks if we are ready to be robbed of our goods, relinquish what we have, and share with the poor. "Do we really welcome poverty as liberating?"

1964 March

"On Pilgrimage - March 1964" (DDLW #813)
Describes their move from the overcrowded Peter Maurin Farm on Staten Island. Appreciates beauty in small things, especially water in streams and sea. Notes speakers, recommends books. Say she is meditating on the mystery of suffering.

1964 April

"On Pilgrimage - April 1964" (DDLW #814)
Chronicles trips to Chicago, Montreal, and Vermont where she visited friends and family, and attended meetings where she often spoke.

1964 April

"The Mystery of the Poor" (DDLW #189)
Answers students' question: "How can you see Christ in people?" Says Christ shows himself in the hands and feet of the poor around us. What we do for the poor we do for Christ which leads to an increase in faith and belief in love.

1964 May

"On Pilgrimage - May 1964" (DDLW #815)
An anniversary column reaffirming Peter Maurin as the founder and their trial and error approach to meet his ideals. Says they are a community of "wounded ones" and are not complacent about accomplishments. Appreciates a day of recollection. Describes their new farm at Tivoli and plans for retreats that will send forth others "to speak truth to power."

1964 June

"On Pilgrimage - June 1964" (DDLW #816)
Recalls visiting the Oratory in Birmingham, England and the life of St. Philip Neri who founded the Oratory in Rome. Stories about money--ill spent tax dollars to alleviate the heavy traffic in their neighborhood, the windfall they received from selling their Staten Island property, capital gains taxes, and fees to lawyers and real estate agents. Explains how they used the windfall to acquire a new farm at Tivoli.

1964 July

"On Pilgrimage - July/August 1964" (DDLW #817)
Tells of the marriage of Tom Cornell to Monica Ribar and the help received in setting up their apartment, the legal troubles of a theatre group, how their soup line started in 1936, and plans to build a model women's prison at Riker's Island.

1964 July

"The Case of Cardinal McIntyre" (DDLW #196)
Elaborates on the Catholic Worker relationship with Church authorities over many years and the "conflict of freedom and authority." Reaffirms the laity's freedom of conscience and leadership role in action against injustice. Reproaches "our shepherds" who fail to preach voluntary poverty and "preach the gospel in season, out of season, and that gospel is 'all men are brothers.'"

1964 September

"On Pilgrimage - September 1964" (DDLW #818)
Urges direct action on behalf of the poor instead of just being critical of the clergy. Criticizes the bureaucracy of the War on Poverty and quotes from the Sermon on the Mount to stress the need for individual action, particularly in regards to helping African-Americans. Keywords: non-violence, voluntary poverty

1964 October

"Fall Appeal - October 1964" (DDLW #819)
Focuses on the joy of their work--"It is a joyful experience, to serve the poor, and to be poor ourselves." Quotes St. Vincent de Paul on serving the poor and how it contributes to a growth in faith.

1964 November

"On Pilgrimage - November 1964" (DDLW #820)
Remembrances of many who died this past year--former workers, guests, friends, benefactors--with descriptions of their work and character. Says their deaths are not cheerless as they will be with God. Mentions lists she keeps in her prayer books of those for whom she prays. Keywords: obituary

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1965 January

"On Pilgrimage - January 1965" (DDLW #821)
Spends four joyful months caring for her grandchildren while her daughter Tamar attends practical nursing school. Describes the struggle against the cold at their women's house of hospitality and challenging discussions about whether they are doing what they advocate (cult, culture, cultivation). Long quote from Gandhi on voluntary poverty.

1965 February

"On Pilgrimage - February 1965" (DDLW #822)

Travels to North Carolina and Georgia to speak and visit friends. Recapitulates basic Catholic Worker ideas in a question and answer format. Comments on the government's war on poverty, Communism in Cuba, the role of the Church in society, Vatican II, and the gap between haves and havenots. Keywords: war, voluntary poverty, work

1965 March

"On Pilgrimage - March 1965" (DDLW #823)

Writing from Albuquerque she contrasts two types of hospitality--the "grand gesture" that doesn't last and the "unspectacular" that perseveres. Opposes a top down governmental approach to helping the poor and is critical of excessive spending for airbases and for Church decorations. Witnesses the brutal breakup of the civil rights march in Selma, Alabama and relates several incidents of violence and segregation in Mississippi. Keywords: Negro, Black

1965 April

"Spring Appeal - April 1965" (DDLW #824)

Asks for help in "this seemingly hopeless and profligate task of feeding the poor." Says she is looking on the face of Christ in the poor she meets in her travels. Keywords: war, poverty

1965 April

"On Pilgrimage - April 1965" (DDLW #825)
Tender account of the death of a friend's father. Details of a long trip through the West and Midwest. Comments on the civil rights struggle, war in Vietnam, and farm labor issues. Visits Ammon Hennacy in Salt Lake City.

1965 May

Peter Maurin, Personalist (DDLW #914)
Tells a story of Peter Maurin's work at the Easton farm and goes on to summarize his principal teachings. Peter was a deeply religious man, a reader and constant student, who recommended books, especially the lives of the saints. He valued physical labor and wanted farming cooperatives, "clarification of thought", and houses of hospitality. His faith was invincible, he exhorted a philosophy of poverty and the study of man's freedom.

1965 June

"Review of In Solitary Witness" (DDLW #827)
Summary: Sees Franz Jagerstatter as a saint and martyr for conscientious objection and primacy of conscience. Capsules his life story. Keywords: saints, non-violence

1965 June

"What Does Ammon Mean?" (DDLW #826)
Chronicles her relationship with Ammon Hennacy, describing his character and memories of him at the Catholic Worker. Praises his pacifism, voluntary poverty, works of mercy, joy, prison experiences, and compassion. Asks for prayers for his reconversion to the Church.

1965 July

"On Pilgrimage - July/August 1965" (DDLW #828)
Quotes from Pope John XXIII about his foul experience in the military. Hopes the Vatican Council will make a clear anti-war statement in line with Jesus' word: "Put up thy sword." Reaffirms a kind of pacifist manifesto: use the weapons of the spirit and take up you cross and follow Jesus.

1965 July

"Review of In Solitary Witness (cont.)" (DDLW #829)
Continues to give details of Franz Jagerstatter's resistance to the Nazi regime. Admires his solitary, almost unnoticed, witness. See him as a beacon for conscientious objectors in the Vietnam era.

1965 September

"On Pilgrimage - September 1965" (DDLW #830)
Grouses about plumbing problems, landlord issues, and needing money for a better house of hospitality. Says we need to do penance for the war in Vietnam, using all our life force. Discourses on love, sex, chastity, purity in relation to God and penance.

1965 October

"On Pilgrimage - October 1965" (DDLW #832)
While in Rome during the fourth session of Vatican Council II, she and a group of women fast and pray, aiming to influence the council deliberations on war and non-violence. Emphasizes the need for lay input in addressing the problems of the modern world. Describes her accommodations and dinners with bishops and friends.

1965 October

"Fall Appeal - October 1965" (DDLW #833)
In asking for help she contrasts the government's "war against poverty" with the Catholic Worker's "true efficiency of the person-to-person encounter." Distinguishes between the poor and the destitute.

1965 November

"Suicide or Sacrifice?" (DDLW #834)
Reflects on the self-immolation of Roger LaPorte as a protest against the Vietnam war. Discusses suicide doctrinally, psychologically, and in literature. Tries to understand his intentions and the need for protest in the midst of war and building for war. Speaks of the notion of the victim soul and why she prays for those who kill themselves.

1965 November

"On Pilgrimage - November 1965" (DDLW #835)
Tales of her travel to Rome to join twenty women on a ten-day fast for peace at Vatican Council II. Shares vignettes of friends, clergy, meetings, books, prayers, Masses, and accommodations. Describes the pain that accompanied her fast.

1965 December

"On Pilgrimage - December 1965" (DDLW #248)
Discusses freedom of conscience and obedience to Church and State in the context of Vatican Council II's condemnation of nuclear war. Lauds the "little way" of St. Therese as the foundation of world peace and a means of social change.

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1966 February

"The Organizer" (DDLW #831)
A chronicle of the life of Cesar Chavez and his organizing work with the National Farm Workers Association. Admires his commitment to non-violence, religious and moral values, and "hope and faith animated by love." Says he is a man of vision and experience. Notes the CW's long-time coverage of agricultural worker struggles.

1966 March

"On Pilgrimage - March 1966" (DDLW #249)
Admits "rambling" about her grandchildren, her reading habits, and books she recommends before getting to the point--"I am afraid I am a traditionalist." She reaffirms her high regard for the liturgical movement and the Mass, objecting to an incident where a coffee cup is used for a chalice. She speaks of CW conflicts and the ongoing struggle of freedom and authority.

1966 April

"Spring Appeal - April 1966" (DDLW #836)
Semi-annual appeal for funds. She says the destitute they take in become part of the Catholic Worker family until they die. Says the Lord asks, "Do you mean what you say when you repeat my words, 'All men are brothers'?"

1966 April

"On Pilgrimage - April 1966" (DDLW #837)
Attends a conference on inter-religious dialogue and goes on a speaking trip through the Midwest. Visits friends and describes their work. Mentions progress in the farm workers strike. Keywords: Vietnam

1966 April

"Poverty and Destitution" (DDLW #838)
Through graphic stories of guests at the Worker she distinguishes between poverty ("the poor have some hope.) and destitution ("The destitute are ill and lonely, the hopeless ones.") Also distinguishes poverty, voluntary poverty, and holy poverty. Keywords: anarchism, pacifist

1966 May

"On Pilgrimage - May 1966" (DDLW #839)
Recalls Peter Maurin's philosophy of poverty and of work on this May Day issue of the paper. Grouses about old cars. Admires the Bill and Dorothy Gauchet's hospitality to disabled and unwanted children. Laments the evils of the war in Vietnam. Praises the radical social critique of Saul Alinsky. Participates in a conference on nonviolence. Praises Cesar Chavez and the updates readers on the farm workers' stike.

1966 June

"On Pilgrimage - June 1966" (DDLW #840)
Reflections on some Catholic Workers being jailed for civil disobedience, visiting the prisoner, and the folly of the cross. Recalls the death of the Rosenbergs and notes new evidence that is surfacing. Includes notes from a visit to her daughter and grandchildren in Vermont. Says the arms race is insanity. Keywords: anarchy, prison, civil rights

1966 July

"Joe Cotter Dies" (DDLW #842)
An obituary for Joe Cotter, a long-time guest at Catholic Worker farms. Appreciates his hard work, compassion, live of beauty, poverty, and suffering. "Pray for us, Joe, that we may, as you did, 'take up the cross, deny ourselves daily, to follow Him, Jesus.'"

1966 July

"DiGiorgio Struck Huelga! Join By Not Buying" (DDLW #841)
Reports on the farm workers strike against the DiGeorgio corporation and lauds the non-violent social movement to give "birth to the new order, the new heaven and new earth in which justice dwelleth."

1966 September

"On Pilgrimage - September 1966" (DDLW #843)
Diary-like chronicle of canning tomatoes, panhandling, use of a missal at Mass, evils of drink, murder of peace activists, a visit to her daughter and grand children, a peacemaker conference, and non-violent work in India.

1966 October

"Fall Appeal - October/November 1966" (DDLW #844)
She asks for help--"It is hard to be a beggar." Admires the voluntary poverty of St. Francis, Gandhi, and Peter Maurin. In contrast, the "destitute and dissolute" are often despised as "bums" in the city and we fail to see "the sacred element in every human being." (Simone Weil)

1966 October

"On Pilgrimage - October/November 1966" (DDLW #845)
Reveals that a pilgrimage in September 1932 to the shrine of the Jesuit martyrs and her later prayer for a vocation at the Blessed mother shrine combined to draw Peter Maurin to her. Resolves to halt travelling to complete writing assignments after two speaking engagements already agreed to. Notes the first wedding of a grand child and death of her brother Donald. Notes the sadness of November with nature dying around us until we rise again.

1966 November

"Reflections During Advent," Part One
"Searching for Christ"
(DDLW #559)
Commenting on the riches and turbulence in an era of renewal of the Church, she decides to write about Mary in her life. Traces her early religious experiences, tells what led her to God, and recounts the gift of a rosary and a statue of Mary. Appreciates the physical and sensual aspects of prayer and relates the mysteries of the rosary to life experiences. Tells of other Marian prayers said at the Catholic Worker and Mary's role in bringing us to Christ.

1966 November

"Reflections During Advent" (DDLW #558)
During the Advent of 1966 Dorothy Day wrote a four-part series for Ave Maria magazine grouped under the title "Reflections During Advent."

1966 December

"On Pilgrimage - December 1966" (DDLW #846)
Recommends two books on pacifism, visits her daughter in Vermont and then friends in Montreal. Attends the funeral of Jane Marra who started the Catholic Worker in Boston.

1966 December

"Reflections During Advent, Part Two"
"The Meaning of Poverty"
(DDLW #560)
Gives examples of false voluntary poverty and refutes the notion that real poverty doesn't exist. Challenges everyone to a personal response, not a government one, to poverty and to ask ourselves "What shall we do?" Gives examples and concludes that all can do something and that whatever work of mercy we perform we "do it for love of Jesus, in His humanity, for love of our brother, for love of our enemy." Points to the scandal of the wealth of the Church and thanks God for the sacraments and the Word in the Scriptures--our light and our food.

1966 December

"Reflections During Advent, Part Three"
"Chastity"
(DDLW #561)
Paints a picture of chastity as "a positive virtue, a strength and a power in the great world around us" through personal stories, and quotes from literature, scripture, and spiritual writers. The marriage act is compared to love and union with God. Speaks of choosen and unchoosen celibacy. Extols friendship, community, and the need to express tenderness.
Other keywords: sex, abortion, purity, new morality

1966 December

"Reflections During Advent, Part Four"
"Obedience'
(DDLW #562)
Ponders the relationship between freedom and authority, faith and obedience. Uses her conversion and starting of the Catholic Worker as examples of conscience and the great freedom of the laity. Cites various authorities and the example of Pope John XXIII on freedom and obedience. Ultimately, links obedience to love and her faith. Repeats the need to "search the Scriptures" and to achieve a "second conversion" to the faith.

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1967 January

"In Peace Is My Bitterness Most Bitter" (DDLW #250)
Expresses her anguish over the works of war in Vietnam, which are the opposite of the works of mercy. She is upset with churchmen calling for "total victory," and notes that the Church is our Mother even though "she is a harlot at times." Calls on each person to work on changing their hearts and attitude.

1967 February

"On Pilgrimage - February 1967" (DDLW #847)
Remembers the work of A.J. Muste for peace and justice at his death. Supports demonstrators against the Vietnam War who disrupt a Mass, saying, however, she would not have participated. Regrets her age keeps her from working for peace in Vietnam as a nurse.

1967 March

"Spring Appeal" (DDLW #251)
An appeal for money to carry on the work of hospitality, and to buy and repair an old house. Compares the CW approach to the city and states' way. Notes that Jesus tells us to ask for what we need, and that our Heavenly Father knows what we need.

1967 March

"On Pilgrimage - March/April 1967" (DDLW #848)
Considers many things--books on scripture, help from the Christian Brothers, a sick roommate, war protests, economics and non-violence, the need to do work in line with the works of mercy.

1967 May

"Spring Mobilization" (DDLW #849)
Brief commentary on a massive nonviolent demonstration against the Vietnam War led by Martin Luther King and Benjamin Spock.

1967 May

Strike Leader Comes East (DDLW #920)
Highlights progress in the grape strikes in California and efforts to organize in other parts of the country. Cesar Chavez visits the Catholic Worker and is admired for his non-violent methods. Advises readers to learn more about the struggle.

1967 May

"On Pilgrimage - May 1967" (DDLW #850)
Praises the changes in the liturgy of the Mass--"I do love the guitar masses." Paraphrases a talk she heard on the price of peace. Frustrated with the new postal requirement to use zip codes in mailing the paper.

1967 May

"Loaves and Fishes" (DDLW #851)
A chapter from Loaves and Fishes. Describes her meeting Peter Maurin and getting out the first edition of The Catholic Worker. Recalls how Peter's program--roundtable discussions, houses of hospitality, and farm colonies--became the core Catholic Worker program. Extensive quotes from Peter Maurin, including an Easy Essay on utopianism and Christian communism.

1967 June

"On Pilgrimage - June 1967" (DDLW #852)
Describes the flight of Catholics, clergy and laity, from North Vietnam and the work of Caritas International to get aid to all Vietnam. Says the work for peace involves the works of mercy. Recommends a book about the Antarctic explorer Ernest Shakleton. Relates his notion of "a mysterious forth man" to guardian angels.

1967 June

"Michael Gold" (DDLW #853)
A remembrance of her long and deep friendship with Mike Gold upon hearing of his death. Recounts their shared zeal for revolution in the 1910s, his anguish over the draft, and his support during the time of her conversion in the 1920s. Notes their differences over the use of violence, she a pacifist. Keywords: obituary

1967 July

"Father Milani R. I. P." (DDLW #854)
Mourns the death of Don Lorenzo Milani, an Italian parish priest who was a staunch defender of conscientious objection to war for Italians.

1967 September

"On Pilgrimage - September 1967" (DDLW #855)
After a quiet rising and a time of spiritual reading her writing time is filled with city street noises. Writes of migrant laborer conditions in New York and Vermont where much of the misery is hidden from view. Keywords: Negro, Black, Afro-American

1967 November

"Fall Appeal - November 1967" (DDLW #856)
An appeal for money. Notes their hospitality for the families of migrants, for pickets in the grape boycott, and the many apartments they rent. "Even as I am writing this a woman comes to borrow twenty-five dollars. She does this every so often and it usually is a dire need."

1967 November

"On Pilgrimage - November 1967" (DDLW #857)
Reports from the Third World Congress for the Lay Apostolate in Rome and receives communion from the Pope. The conference "resolutions" seemed inadequate to her regarding birth control and war. Says "No one of course was really satisfied with the resolutions but most felt that they were beginnings of discussion, and that a great deal of work was necessary on the part of lay people to work and study and develop a strong conscience about the problems of the day."

1967 December

"On Pilgrimage - December 1967" (DDLW #858)
Reports on Catholic Worker participation in demonstrations in New York and at the Pentagon against the draft. Says they refrain when participants repudiate non-violence, which they practice. Says we have to pray from deliverance from fear of our enemies. Gives details of her visit to England, the many friends met and groups visited. Went on a pilgrimage and had speaking engagements.

1967 December

"Danilo Dolci's Sicily" (DDLW #859)
While in Rome she takes a side trip to see the work of Danilo Dolci. She admires his techniques of organizing and energizing the poor to rebuild Sicili using experts, holding meetings and nonviolence, especially when resisting the mafia. Sees similarities to Peter Maurin's approach.

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1968 January

"A Meeting with Ignazio Silone" (DDLW #860)
Interviews novelist Ignazio Silone and appreciates his central message of man's dignity and capacity for greatness, to the point of laying down one's life. Recounts Silone's characters who portray the message of redemption. Is grateful for the interview of "a moral hero of out time."

1968 January

Untitled (DDLW #947)
Expressed support for all men facing conscription for the Vietnam War.

1968 February

"Tribute to the Nelsons" (DDLW #861)
Praises the dedicated work of Wally and Juanita Nelson for peace, conscientious objection, and tax resistance. Notes their willingness to be jailed and to fast for their convictions. Calls the undeclared Vietnam war "this hideous struggle."

1968 February

"On Pilgrimage - February 1968" (DDLW #862)

Resists the "January doldrums" and writes about the continuing struggle of California farm workers. Tells of her visit to Sicily and England, giving details of the plane flights and her reasons for preferring planes over buses and ships. Praises the work of mercy of a disabled man. Keyword: nonviolence

1968 March

"On Pilgrimage - March 1968" (DDLW #863)

Revels in the beauty and worship of newly composed liturgical music. Gives details of her visit to the Taena community in England and eulogizes Fr. H. A. Reinhold for his labor activities. Mentions a new edition of Ammon Hennacy's autobiography, praises his activism and nonviolent stance but rejects his criticism of Scripture.

1968 March

"Spring Appeal - March 1968" (DDLW #864)
Asks for aid describing their crowded tenement, and notes the coming and going of the young as well as the needs of older long-term guests. Looks for signs of spring after a hard winter. In spite of poverty she admits how acquisitive they can be for books, time, and loving kindness.

1968 April

"Fear In Our Time" (DDLW #253)
Recounts times she experienced strong fear--being shot at and verbally abused in the South, in prison. Urges praying for the courage to bear pain and hardship because of one's belief in pacifism and faith in God.

1968 April

"On Pilgrimage - April 1968" (DDLW #252)
Describes her reactions to hearing that Martin Luther King was shot and killed. Memorializes his Gospel faith and teaching of non-violence.

1968 June

Life And Death (DDLW #886)
Reports on hearing Senator Robert Kennedy was shot but still alive. Recalls the assassinations of Martin Luther King and President Kennedy. Prays the Jesus prayer.

1968 June

"On Pilgrimage - June 1968" (DDLW #865)
A series of diary-like entries describing protests in New York regarding peace, race, and the closing of Sydenham Hospital. Interspersed are events of friends, including the confirmation of Peggy Baird and a wedding at the farm. Reports on plans for the summer, including a speaking engagement at the Pax conference and attendance at the Poor People's Campaign protests in Washington, DC.

1968 July

On Pilgrimage - Jul/Aug 1968 (DDLW #887)
Reports on their move to a renovated building on First Street, the move, the cost. Describes programs for children up near the farm in Tivoli. Mentions just published A Penny a Copy, a reader of articles from the paper. Goes on retreat and visits friends.

1968 September

On Pilgrimage - September 1968 (DDLW #888)
Journeys through the South--D.C., Georgia, Alabama, and Mississippi. Comments on the civil rights struggle and the work being done. Is saddened at all the violence in the world--Vietnam, Nigeria, and in Chicago at the Democratic Convention.

1968 October

On Pilgrimage - October 1968 (DDLW #889)
Bemoans the destruction and suffering of war and violence. Recaps the resistance of the Catonsville Nine and Milwaukee Fourteen. Shares neighborhood stories and their poverty. Resumes her account of a trip to Mississippi and civil rights accomplishments.

1968 October

Fall Appeal - October 1968 (DDLW #890)
An appeal for help on the mortgages for their new house on Christie Street. Reminds us that love of the poor requires an act of faith, as sometimes love is a hard struggle.

1968 December

On Pilgrimage - December 1968 (DDLW #891)
Reflects on her recent reading--about priests witnessing in prison, especially the Berrigan brothers whom she admires. Comments also on essays about the Civil War and the freedom struggle of blacks.

1968 December

Thomas Merton, Trappist 1915-1968 (DDLW #901)
Upon learning of Thomas Merton's sudden death, she quotes a letter from him refuting the suggestion he was leaving monastic life. In the quotes, Merton clarifies his role in the peace movement and gives a Christmas message of hope at a time when we need courage.

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1969 January

On Pilgrimage - January 1969 (DDLW #893)
Relishes the quiet of her room in their new house and describes the work and cost of renovation. Connects the many forms of love and how hard love is. She notes with bitterness the bombing of Catholic churches in Vietnam.

1969 January

Strike Leader (DDLW #892)
Details the efforts of the farm workers to unionize and the grape boycott. Compares Cesar Chavez to other non-violent leaders and says they are the word made flesh. Digresses about hospitality as following "Him who came not to be served but to serve."

1969 February

Sanctuary (DDLW #895)
Responds to Karl Meyer's proposal for universal sanctuary for sleeping using empty structures, especially churches. She recalls, in her response, the large municipal lodging houses during the depression. Reiterates the need to build a new society in the shell of the old, using "neither capitalist, nor communist, nor totalitarian means, but accomplished through non-violence.

1969 February

On Pilgrimage - February 1969 (DDLW #894)
Highlights the struggle and despair of the times, recounts a conversation on faith with Mike Gold, an old Communist friend. Discourses on penance and voluntary suffering as acts of love that increase hope. Says we each have unique vocations to the works of mercy.

1969 March

Spring Appeal - March 1969 (DDLW #897)
Notes the signs of spring, the bustle of hospitality, and energy of youthful volunteers. Makes an appeal for aid, “We are beggars for the poor….”

1969 March

On Pilgrimage - March 1969 (DDLW #896)
Explains why the paper is often late. Describes recent Friday Night Meetingsâ€"a scholar of Martin Buber, volunteers to China during the cultural revolution, a PAX meeting and an article by Thomas Merton on non-violence.

1969 May

On Pilgrimage - May 1969 (DDLW #898)
Reflects on the abilities of a woman to press on with the "business of living" even as life is mixed with joys and anguish. Details coming speakers at their Friday night meetings. Shares stories of time with her daughter and grandchildren in Vermont, what each is doing with their lives. Remembers two dear friends, Marie Langlots and Fred Lindsey, who have recently died. Key words: Peter Maurin, obituary, Tamar.

1969 June

Frank's Landing (DDLW #900)
Highlights a visit to Frank's Landing in Washington and learning of the plight of the Indians as they fought for their fishing rights. Many students from local universities created a living community that taught the ways of survival living amidst their demonstrations.  Maiselle Bridges' narrates the story and living situation of the educational community and the other hardships the Indian reservations are experiencing.

1969 June

On Pilgrimage - June 1969 (DDLW #899)
Detailed account of the strike of the United Farm Workers in California (Coachella Valley, Delano) led by Cesar Chavez and her visit to the West Coast. Reports on the strike movement and details the current strike climate and actions being taken. The strikers demands are explained and she calls on the readership to support the strikers in their fight. Keywords: non-violence, grape boycott

1969 July

"Hutterite Communities" (DDLW #179)
Describes her visit to a Hutterite community and gives a brief history of their existence. Bases their life on Acts 2:42, which depicts a form of distribution. Other beliefs of the community are adult baptism, self-help, property in common, rejection of the state, and pacifism. Sees the Hutterites and the Kibbutizims of Israel as successful examples of farming communes as advocated by Peter Maurin.

1969 October

Fall Appeal - October 1969 (DDLW #904)
An appeal for funds. She says they have enough for a month or two and reminds us that we will receive as we measure our gifts.

1969 October

David Mason 1897-1969 (DDLW #903)
An obituary for David Mason a Catholic Worker beginning in 1937. Details his abundant energy and work in Philadelphia, New York, and on Catholic Worker farms. His was a lifetime of doing the works of mercy.

1969 October

On Pilgrimage - Oct/Nov 1969 (DDLW #902)
Travels to Chicago and meets friends from the peace movement. Attends prayer meetings and especially appreciates a Taize community. Attends an Operation Bread Basket meeting. Visits Milwaukee and describes the work of Fr. Groppi, Michael Cullen, and others: Keywords: non-violence, resistance, Jesse Jackson, Ralph Abernathy, racism, housing.

1969 December

On Pilgrimage - December 1969 (DDLW #905)
Responds to those who critique their work as a band-aid for a cancer. Reaffirms the necessity for the works of mercy. Tidbits of life at the worker: getting out the paper, a trip to the sea, books arriving. Travels to PA and OH and reflects on the work of miners. Visits house in Cleveland and Detroit. Is moved by a Pentecostal prayer meeting.

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