The Catholic Worker Movement

Dorothy Day's writings from 1940 to 1949

1940 | 1941 |1942 | 1943 | 1944 | 1945 | 1946 | 1947 | 1948 | 1949 |

1940 January

Day After Day - With Those Who Labor In South's Vineyards (DDLW #352)
Chatty account of a trip with her daughter to Alabama where she visits St. Peter Claver, union halls, and the local bishop who is involved with work on behalf of seamen. Misses being home in New York and is grateful for the news of a good Christmas there.

1940 January

Pensacola Fishermen (DDLW #353)
Reports on the hard life of Gulf fishermen in Pensacola, Florida. Underscores the need for study clubs and the need for the men to become owners through the cooperative movement as a way to change their lives.

1940 February

"Aims and Purposes" (DDLW #182)
Restates the central vision of the Catholic Worker Movement as working for "a new heaven and a new earth, wherein justice dwelleth." This vision recognizes the "primacy of the spritual" and the doctrine of the Mystical Body of Christ. The Catholic Worker is "a new way of life" involving Houses of Hospitality for the daily practice of the Works of Mercy and Farming Communes where each person can take responsibility of doing their part.

1940 February

Day After Day - February 1940 (DDLW #354)
Visiting Catholic Worker houses in Baltimore and Philadelphia, she reflects on the part everyone plays in the whole movement and feels a sense of solidarity. Notes how they suffer from the cold in New York. Tells of a visit to the headquarters of the National Maritime Union and their fine reading room.

1940 March

Seattle, Portland, and Points South (DDLW #355)
Lists all the people and groups she visited and spoke to in Seattle and Portland, describing their projects to help the poor and the worker.

1940 March

Hooverville (DDLW #941)
Tours a town of shacks and learns of their desperate straits. Interviews town residents. Says Christ suffers with them and asks God to have pity on them and us "who permit such things to be."

1940 May

Seattles C. W. House Has Many Activities (DDLW #359)
Short vignette about the House of Hospitality in Seattle, a cooperative house of unemployable men, and a generous family's little farm.

1940 May

C. W. Editor On W. Coast; Story of Lettuce Workers (DDLW #356)
Tells of many meetings and talks around San Francisco. Recalls the union busting and violence against lettuce workers near Salinas. Laments the lack of leaders to bring Catholic social teaching to the workers. Wants "fellow travelers with the poor and dispossessed," who will spread the Gospel, recognizing that the poor are "creatures of body and soul."

1940 May

Disgraceful Plight Of Migrant Workers On California Farms (DDLW #357)
Witnesses the struggles of migrant farm workers in the San Joachin Valley of California and the class war with the big business interests of the Associated Farmers. Is ambivalent about government help for the workers, preferring cooperatives and personal responsibility to corporation farming and birth control clinics for the rural proletariat.

1940 May

Catholic Worker Ideas On Hospitality (DDLW #358)
Defends against the charge that they do more harm than good in providing hospitality to the undeserving. Asserts that doing the Works of Mercy is following Christ and a revolutionary technique. Points to the monastic tradition of indiscriminate hospitality. Other keywords: Communism, hospices, social order.

1940 June

Day After Day - Thoughts On Breadlines And On The War (DDLW #361)
Recommends daily Mass and Communion as a necessary means of bringing relief to those suffering in war and on the breadlines. Announces the formation of a "Non-Participation League"--refusing to buy from or support unjust companies as a training in voluntary poverty and non-violent resistance.

1940 June

Tribute to Mr. O'Connell (DDLW #362)
An appreciation of the carpentry labors of Mr. O'Connell at the Easton farm, his storytelling, and love of children and animals.

1940 June

Our Stand (DDLW #360)
Reasserts their pacifist stand and opposes the use of force in the labor movement, in class struggle, and struggles between countries. Quotes Catholic theologians and Popes. Repeats that God's Word is Love and that using only non-violent means is indeed "the Folly of the Cross." Doubts that the conditions for a "just war" can be met in these times.

1940 July

"C. W.'s Position" (DDLW #363)
Excerpts from her testimony to Congress opposing conscription. Extensive quotes from Church sources and others who argue that conscription is against the natural right to free choice of work and personal liberty of action.

1940 July

And There Remained Only the Very Poor (DDLW #364)
"Those of you who read this, those of you who have helped us before, help us." A thousand poor people come for food each day--". . .they are Christ appearing to you." In spite of their dire straits, war and preparation for war, she calls for rejoicing in nature and for what they have and God sends.

1940 September

"Still Time To Protest The Draft" (DDLW #365)
Urgent appeal to protest the peace-time Conscription Bill before Congress. Asks readers to write their Congressmen noting that any delay will make for "clear and calm reasoning."

1940 September

"Wars Are Caused By Man's Loss Of His Faith In Man" (DDLW #366)
Non-violent resistance requires faith in man--his freedom and capacity for love of God and neighbor. The oppressor can be overcome by spiritual values. We cannot lose hope but renew our faith in the teaching and example of Jesus Christ.

1940 October

"Short Trip To Near-by C. W. Groups" (DDLW #367)
Admires the work of Ade Bethune's "folk school" in Newport, Rhode Island, calling it "one of the most interesting cells of the Catholic Worker." Describes the work of nearby Catholic Worker farms. Gives a talk where she stresses that the evils in the world are not inevitable, are not from God but from man's misuse of free will.

1940 December

"Winter Arrives, Work in House And Trip to West" (DDLW #368)
Hard winter conditions in New York has them working to stay warm. Takes a trip through the Middle West visiting houses of hospitality and describes their work. Applauds the Grail for a philosophy of labor.

1940 December

"A New Year Begins" (DDLW #369)
Lauds their daily routine of prayer, reading, and hospitality in New York and around the country. Says they feed 900 for breakfast, and a couple of hundred at lunch and supper.

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1941 January

"Views and News" (DDLW #370)
Contrasts ugliness (a street fight) and beauty (a recitation of the psalms at the house by a friend). Mentions visitors, a birth, a death, and a day of recollection.

1941 January

"A Baby is Born" (DDLW #186)
A vivid description of a young woman leaving St. Joseph's house by ambulance to have her baby. Expresses joy at the child's birth even in the midst of poverty and a time of war. "With the woman the suffering brought forthy life. In war, death."

1941 February

"Day After Day - February 1941" (DDLW #371)
Describes her busy speaking schedule and laments that there's so much to do. Advises sowing time to reap time. Attends meetings in Baltimore and a dinner with Sigrid Undset.

1941 April

"Works of Mercy Oppose Violence in Labor's War" (DDLW #147)
Involves the C.W. in strikes in order to spread Catholic social teaching and promote better living conditions. Combats the charge that the C.W. is communist and encourages spiritual weapons to fight communism.

1941 May

"Day After Day - May 1941" (DDLW #372)
Expounds on the value of manual labor and the opening of new Catholic Worker houses. Argues that it is right that the Catholic Worker campaign against the underlying social injustices which cause hunger, poverty, homelessness, and war. Asks for respect when views differ.

1941 July

"Day After Day - July/August 1941" (DDLW #373)
Diary-like account of a trip to Catholic Worker houses and farms through the Midwest. Ends on retreat in Pittsburgh given by Fr. Hugo and says they left renewed, with a new perspective.

1941 September

"Day After Day - September 1941" (DDLW #374)
Describes the Catholic Worker silent retreat at the farm in Easton, Pennsylvania. Says the retreat is "a course of instruction in basic principles and tactics"--a time "to gird up the loins and strengthen oneself for the strong combat."

1941 October

"Day After Day - October 1941" (DDLW #375)
A letter to a bed-ridden Catholic Worker telling of their new women's house of hospitality--Mary's House. Describes bits of beauty in the city, many visitors and conversations, and the condition of miners in Chile.

1941 November

"Day After Day - November 1941" (DDLW #376)
Renews opposition to peacetime conscription and urges readers to write the government, talk about it at meetings, and pray and do penance--"This program is open to us all." Enrolls her daughter in a "domestic science" school in Montreal. Includes a canticle of thanksgiving about little beauties in the city.

1941 December

"Day After Day - December 1941" (DDLW #377)
Comments on union elections and favors John L. Lewis because of his opposition to war. Colorful description of her surroundings and the changing seasons. News of a wedding, illness, a birth, and visitors.

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1942 January

Our Country Passes from Undeclared War to Declared War; We Continue Our Christian Pacifist Stand (DDLW #868)
A month after Pearl Harbor she reaffirms the gospel basis of pacifism. Says she will not be carping in her criticism of our country but refuses to participate in war. Recommends constant prayer, the works of mercy, and mutual forbearance in disagreements.

1942 January

"Day After Day - January 1942" (DDLW #378)
Laments the country at war. Describes the hectic Christmas period, the many gifts, the ongoing work of hospitality, the illnesses of workers, her travels, and reading for the month. Asks forgiveness for not getting all the letters written.

1942 February

"Why Do the Members of Christ Tear One Another?" (DDLW #390)
Protesting against a journalist's assertion that they are sentimentalists in their pacifism and afraid of suffering, she challenges her critics to spend time in the city slums where Catholic Workers regularly battle the realities of disease, poverty, filth, cold, foul smells, etc. Quoting Dostoevsky, she assures her readers that Catholic Workers were not sanctimonious but approached their work with true humility and love. Notes with irony that pacifism, while not popular with society as a whole, was the philosophy which society wished to impose on the poor and disenfranchised victims of America's class war. Rejects the suggestion that they should remain silent.

1942 February

"Day After Day - February 1942" (DDLW #380)
Shares her enthusiasm for Raisa Maritain's autobiography, We Have Been Friends Together. Defends their reaching out to all the poor, not just those deemed "deserving" of assistance. Reviews the positions taken on World War II by various Catholic Worker houses throughout the country, admitting that not all have their "in season, out of season" pacifism.

1942 April

"Day After Day - April 1942" (DDLW #381)
Begins with an appeal for two worthy causes--the Bishop's relief fund for war victims and the New York Catholic Charities. Ponders the role of citizens during wartime and our penchant for choosing men of action, like General MacArthur, as heroes rather than figures like Pope Pius XII. Envisions speaking about rayer in Wartime, the rural life movement, feeding the poor and hungry, and the use of decentralism and other means for producing social change on an upcoming West Coast trip. Denies that her strict pacifism has split the Catholic Worker movement and points out that they face more reader-resistance for their policy against denying aid to the "undeserving" poor.

1942 May

"Go To The Poor" (DDLW #383)
Inspired by the beauty and inner-city location of Los Angeles' St. Bibiana Cathedral, this editorial focuses on the poor--" The closer we are to the poor, the closer to Christ's love." Because May, 1942 marked The Catholic Worker's tenth year, reminds readers that we are called to love all men, friend and foe alike, because all are brothers--"love is shown by works of mercy, not by war."

1942 May

"Day After Day - May 1942" (DDLW #382)
Reviews her lecture-tour and visit to Catholic Worker groups begun on March 29th through Montreal; Baltimore, where she revisited acquaintances at St. Peter Claver's; Cincinnati; a lecture at a girls' school in nearby Kentucky and a visit to a state mental hospital; St. Louis where she renewed old friendships and was reminded of America's racial problems; Oklahoma City and a visit to a federal reformatory and St. Patrick's Guest House where she visited conscientious objectors. Muses how this journey is part of the work although she prefers settling down.

1942 June

"In Sundry Times and Places" (DDLW #219)
Contrasts the scenic countryside as she travels by bus and Phil. 4:8-9 with a magazine article description of commando training in England.

1942 June

"Grave Injustice Done Japanese On West Coast" (DDLW #218)
Decries the resettlement of Japanese Americans during World War II into concentration camps and describes their living conditions.

1942 June

"Day After Day - June 1942" (DDLW #217)
Expresses a joyful heart in the midst of war preparations. Visits friends, Bishops, and West Coast Houses of Hospitality in Seattle and Los Angelus.

1942 July

"Day After Day - July/August 1942" (DDLW #384)
Updates about Odell Waller's execution, the plight of Japanese-Americans in detention camps, the release of Panchelly, Woodworth, and Brown from Trenton Penetentiary, and the doings of various Catholic Workers such as Ossie Bondy, Peter Maurin, and Ade Bethune. Recounts her brushes with the FBI inquiring about conscientious objectors and the Office of Censorship, and shares her concern that the military has occupied land belonging to Catholic institutions. Gives the schedule of retreats, a description of Mott Street in oppresive Summer heat and various infestations, and an expression of gratitude to Nina Polcyn (Milwaukee) and Justine L'Esperance (Detroit) for their help.

1942 September

"Day After Day - September 1942" (DDLW #385)
A St. Joseph Day bequest provides an opportunity to explain why The Catholic Worker has never incorporated and the nature of its organizational philosophy favoring smallness. As he had promised, Tony Pereiro brings spindles, similar to those used by Gandhi, as souvenirs from his trip to India which are viewed as "revolutionary implements," symbols of another way of life.


Keywords: industrialism, philosophy of the Catholic Worker

1942 November

"Day After Day - November 1942" (DDLW #386)
Recounts her travels throughout the Midwest, reviews CW accomplishments and establishments, updates on various Catholic Worker activities, and those serviing in the armed forces. Notes the creation of two conscientious objector camps and the formation of the Association of Catholic Conscientious Objectors. A lengthy description of people and activities centered on the farm at Avon, Ohio.

1942 December

"Day After Day - December 1942" (DDLW #220)
Discusses the objection that the Catholic Worker has made pacifism a precept, not a counsel like poverty, chastity, and obedience. Says over emphasis on authority leads to totalitarianism. Violent means will not bring forth an end result of peace.

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1943 January

"If Conscription Comes For Women" (DDLW #222)
Asserts she would not register for the draft because it is the first step toward war and answers common objections to her stance. Cites the Holy Father, Thoreau, and E. I. Watkin, founder of the PAX movement in England. Keywords: pacifism, conscientious objection, taxes.

1943 January

"Day After Day - January 1943" (DDLW #221)
A general summary of the Catholic Worker after 10 years--list of houses and farms (open and closed), marriages, births, deaths; whereabouts of workers; her travels. Notes they making an attempt at applying a personalist, communitarian philosophy, and quotes Eric Gill's notion of "a cell of good living." Keywords: philosophy of the Catholic Worker, conscientious objection.

1943 February

"Day After Day" (DDLW #148)
Discusses the two major subjects of her speaking engagements, Peter Maurin, whom she describes as founder and mind of the C.W., and personalism, which she describes as communitarian, and the philosophy of both P. Maurin and the C.W.. Describes some of the difficulties in living the CW vocation and running farming communes. Recommends reading the Desert Fathers and Aldous Huxley's Grey Eminence to understand personalism and communitarianism.

1943 March

"Day After Day - March 1943" (DDLW #387)
Describes her tour of the South in prose which evokes the rigors of travelling by bus in wartime and her reactions to the people she meets in Florida and Alabama. Praises the work of priests and religious in Alabama. Describes the hard work and poor housing for Negroes, Southern land ownership patterns, and race relations.

1943 April

"Day After Day - April 1943" (DDLW #388)
Mediates on the Catholic Worker's mission to all the poor--including those who are deemed unworthy of assistance by some who blame the poor for their condition. Concludes the story of her Southern travels with observations on Alabama, Georgia, and South Carolina. Updates readers on the status of the women's Bayard Street shelter and the history behind Ade Bethune's illustrated Stations of the Cross.

1943 May

Aims and Purposes (DDLW #919)
On the tenth anniversary of The Catholic Worker she explains their purpose as promoting love of God and our brother. Their work expresses the beauty of Christianity in supporting the worker, the poor, and eschewing violence. She highlights instances of violent racism.

1943 May

"Day After Day - May 1943" (DDLW #389)
Description of their Mott Street neighborhood where in the midst of poverty there is real joy. Recalls the beauty of Holy Week services and the Catholic Worker's international network of friends and correspondents. Appeals for sheets and household items.

1943 June

"Day After Day - June 1943" (DDLW #392)
Dorothy meditates on the importance of books to her, Peter Maurin, and to the Catholic Worker tradition. Mentions many titles and relates reading to prayer and joy.

1943 June

"Where is Sanctuary?" (DDLW #391)
She is appalled that some don't believe the killing of Jews in Nazi-occupied Europe. Cites documented incidents of mass killings. Lists twelve recommendations for rescue, among them a change in immigration laws in the United States. Keywords: anti-semitism

1943 July

"Day After Day - Jul Aug 1943" (DDLW #394)
Notes from her date book about visitors, talks attended and given, meetings, and visits to friends.

1943 July

"On Retreat" (DDLW #393)
Summarizes the first day's conferences of a weeklong silent retreat. Emphasis is on learning to increase our love of God through the right ordering of our desires in every day actions. Comments on the surroundings.

1943 September

"Day After Day - September 1943" (DDLW #395)
Explains why she is leaving The Catholic Worker for a year of "solitude and silence" to practice the "weapons of the Spirit." Notes all those who will carry on the work and says she will continue to write and says her Christian pacifist stance hasn't changed.

1943 October

"Notes By The Way - October 1943" (DDLW #396)
Exuberant description of a month spent at a Grail folk school where work, crafts, prayer, meditation, liturgies, lectures, and fasting intermingled. Includes her notes of presentations on the Mass, liturgical singing, and the psalms.

1943 November

"And For Our Absent Bretheren" (DDLW #397)
Alone in the country, she reflects on all the "absent brethren" in New York, soldiers, prisoners, conscientious objectors, refugees--the lonely multitudes in war time. Describes her daily prayer routine. Lauds the State School of Applied Agriculture where her daughter Tamar attends.

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1944 January

"Notes By The Way - January 1944" (DDLW #398)
A series of quotes and biblical citations on love of God and neighbor, and the means of putting on Christ through poverty, solitude, and self-discipline. Says Jesus was not nationalistic, appreciates the doctrine of the Mystical Body and communion of saints.

1944 February

"Farming Communes" (DDLW #149)
Defines personalism as the realization that one "cannot find satisfaction in this life unless he reckons that there is only God and himself." Discusses the difficulties of farming communes and the need to establish the communal aspects of Christianity.

1944 March

Monte Cassino (DDLW #943)
Describes the monastery of Monte Cassino, the birthplace of the rule of St. Benedict, and its occupation by the German army. Quoting John Cardinal Newman, reflects on how often the patient work of monasteries is often undone by invaders. Notes the monastic spirit's ability to restore itself after destruction thereby preserving tradition.

1944 March

"Notes By The Way - March 1944" (DDLW #399)
Her theme is foodâ€"in the scriptures, fasting, unnecessary desires, factory foodâ€"against the backdrop of the Lenten observance of fasting as a way to freedom.

1944 May

"Notes By The Way - May 1944" (DDLW #400)
Delights in the wedding of her daughter Tamar to David Hennessy at the Easton farm. Notes the sad loss of goats to wild dogs but reaffirms the worth of life on the land.

1944 June

"Msgr. Barry O'Toole" (DDLW #402)
Eulogizes Msgr. Barry O'Toole, a friend of the Worker since its origins. Remembers him as a talkative teacher, founder of a house of hospitality in Pittsburgh, and defender of the right to be a pacifist and conscientious objector.

1944 June

"Random Reflections" (DDLW #401)
Reflects on the enduring struggle to understand suffering love, penance, the joy and pain of our bodies, the beauty of a woman's body, and the example of the saints. Mentions numerous books she loves and some she doesn't care for.

1944 July

"Once Upon A Time" (DDLW #403)
A "fictional" account of priests and workers, those who find the way and those who are led astray, all figure in this story of "all of us. . .myself and you." There is Father Joy who dislikes mortification and detachment. Father Cross speaks of the daily cross and the text "He who says he has done enough has already perished." We meet Minimus the drunk, Fabiola, a woman who enjoys find things, and Lefty who gives up everything for Christ.

1944 October

"Background For Peter Maurin" (DDLW #405)
A detailed description of Mott Street's environs and the people who lived there as a backdrop to writing about Peter Maurin--"a genius, a saint, an agitator, a lecturer, a poor man and a shabby tramp; all in one." Reviews his early life, much of the story told in Peter's own words.

1944 October

"Sow In This Field" (DDLW #404)
An appeal for money from readers which represents bread, warmth, and shelter.

Says that the poor not only need natural help but the spiritual nourishment afforded by retreats and days of recollection.

1944 November

"Day After Day - November 1944" (DDLW #406)
In the guise of sending news to those serving in the military or in prison she writes a chatty column "of gossip". Describes life at Maryfarm and her trip through the Midwest. Lauds manual labor and self-sufficiency.

1944 December

"Poverty and Pacifism" (DDLW #223)
Elaborates on the vision of voluntary poverty and what it implies for the kind of work we do, what we eat and drink, how we entertain ourselves. Recommends decentralized living and numerous books. Says "We need saints. God, give us saints."

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1945 January

"Day By Day - January 1945" (DDLW #407)
Updates about new residents and helpers at "Mary's rooms" on Mott Street and the activities in New York and the farm at Easton. Meditates on the means and ends in the spiritual life noting the tension created between those who concentrate on "good works" and those who prefer "spiritual methods." Asks for books and supplies for Maryfarm. Keywords: retreat

1945 February

"Background for Peter Maurin" (DDLW #151)
A chapter from her unpublished book "Peter Maurin." Comments on P. Maurin's thoughts on capitalism and socialism and the idea that Papal Encyclicals try to make an "acquisitive society functional."

1945 February

"More About Holy Poverty. Which Is Voluntary Poverty." (DDLW #150)
"Am I my brothers keeper?" Argues that increased state intervention limits personal freedom and responsibility. Sees the social security legislation and other state programs as taking responsibility from the community, parish, family and person. Voluntary poverty on the other hand promotes responsibility, since it comes directly from the person.

1945 March

"Notes By The Way - March 1945" (DDLW #408)
Shares her enthusiasm for William Cobbett, an early distributist, and describes plans and planting activities slated for Maryfarm and New York. Meditates on the virtues of reading, silence, prayer, and proper mental attitude. Scripture, Rodriguez, Butler, Charles de Foucault, and others are quoted at length.

1945 April

"Day After Day - April 1945" (DDLW #409)
New life brings joy and excitement to Maryfarm as Tamar gives birth to a baby girl while a new kid and new crops enrich the farm. A retreat and the Holy Week liturgy brings spiritual renewal to those at Easton.

1945 May

"Rescued From Dead Storage" (DDLW #410)
Asked to visit a woman committed to the psychopathic ward of Bellevue Hospital for an anti-Semitic remark, she recalls harrowing experiences with the mentally disturbed and tales of unjust incarcerations in psychiatric hospitals. These memories, plus an unpleasant encounter with one of Bellevue's doctors, prompts her interest in studying Belgium's decentralized methods for dealing with the mentally ill.

1945 June

"Day After Day - June 1945" (DDLW #411)
Inspired by an exhibition of Georges Roualt's paintings, she considers his favorite themes--the judge, the prostitute, and the clown--saying there is some "of each in all of us." Describes people who live the folly of the Cross--a doctor living with the poor in Washington, those in conscientious objector camps, and those in jail for refusing the draft. Opposes peace-time conscription. Issues an appeal for Blackfriars magazine and recalls early meetings with Jacques Maritain.

1945 July

"Notes By The Way - July August 1945" (DDLW #413)
Diary-like short accounts of liturgical celebrations, retreats, and doings at Maryfarm and Mott Street, including the visit of two F.B.I. men seeking the whereabouts of a draft evader. Mentions reading Raissa Maritain's Adventures in Grace and a visit to cloistered Maryknoll sisters which is inspiring. Thoughts on imprisonment and modesty. Anticipates her pilgrimage to the Shrine of Mother Cabrini.

1945 July

"The Servile State" (DDLW #412)
Inveighs against social security legislation in Britain and America noting that Hillaire Belloc prophesized it in his 1912 book The Servile State. Proposes a Catholic solution based on distributism, ownership, and "the little way." Recalls Belloc's visit to the Catholic Worker.

1945 September

"Notes By The Way - September 1945" (DDLW #414)
Describes the celebrations taking place in New York City following the announcement of the end of the Second World War. Writes about pilgrimages and their pilgrimage in thanksgiving for peace as well as in penance for having used the atomic bomb--a ten mile walk in the city at night accompanied by song and prayer. Gives accolades for the cooks, the volunteers at the farm, and those in the city.

1945 September

"Peter the Materialist" (DDLW #152)
Another chapter from her unpublished biography of P. Maurin. Describes St. Francis as the great personalist and goes on to explicate a philosophy of work. Sees it as a gift, a vocation that one should find what he/she does best and develop it. Encourages scholars to become workers and workers to become scholars in order that more understanding exit between the two. Defends Peter from the criticism of being a materialist and portrays him as an apostle to the world, not of the world.

1945 September

"We Go on Record: the CW Resonse to Hiroshima" (DDLW #554)
Denounces the atomic bombing of Hiroshima and is outraged at the jubilation in the press. Juxtaposes words and images that contrast the evil of the bomb's destruction with God's creative love. Keywords: pacifism, war

1945 October

Manna Is Sometimes Rabbits (DDLW #909)
An appeal for funds to pay bills and buy food. Describes those who are fed as Ambassadors of Christ.

1945 October

"Notes By The Way - October 1945" (DDLW #415)
Some thoughts on death after the sudden passing of a co-worker. Tells of Workers returning from war, painting chores, and prayers for conversions. Speaks of wanting to finish a novel that includes themes from the retreat given at Maryfarm and which has drawn criticism.

1945 November

"Notes By The Way - November 1945" (DDLW #461)
Deeply personal account of being with her dying mother.Includes prayers and meditations on death and dying. Prays to the Little Flower for her mother. Evidence of answered prayer came in a variety of roses from different sources.

1945 November

"An Appeal to Women" (DDLW #153)
Encourages the "personal" application of Christian principles. Gives practical approaches to this task and advocates "the little way."

1945 December

"Room For Christ" (DDLW #416)
Meditation on hospitality, that is, seeing Christ in those around us, ministering to others the way Christ ministered and was ministered to; with examples of this from the Scriptures. Encourages all to some form of the "privilege" of hospitality not because people remind us of Christ "but because they are Christ."

1945 December

"Notes By the Way" (DDLW #224)
Tells of the work and people at numerous Catholic Worker houses and farms on a journey through New York, Michigan, Ohio, and Pennsylvania.

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1946 January

"Called To Be Saints" (DDLW #418)
Emphasizes the need to strive for holiness. Lists the various retreats offered on the farm and notes secular writers and books with the same message. Quotes St. Thomas who describes holiness as "the end to which one must tend."

1946 February

"On Pilgrimage - February 1946" (DDLW #419)
Explains why she is changing the name of the column to On Pilgrimage. A diary-like record of people and events around the Worker in January 1946--looting in the neighborhood, running out of coal, medical visits, butchering a hog. Comments on worthwhile work.

1946 March

"Clothes" (DDLW #421)
Describes how a needy person, a veteran, became the recipient of clothing that was donated that very same day and comments on the way "cards and papers" are becoming necessary to establish one's identity.

1946 March

"On Pilgrimage - March 1946" (DDLW #420)
Quotes from Cardinal Newman's Lenten sermons on the Crossand austerity. Comments on the sacrifices daily living requires, notes visitors: a priest and a former lieutenant, and upholds discussion as a necessity for indoctrination and clarification of thought. Contrasts the death of a Catholic worker with the birth of a baby to the wife of a political prisoner in jail for refusing conscription. Tells of the closing of the Boston House of Hospitality and ends by commending the volunteers who sell the newspaper.

1946 April

"On Pilgrimage - April 1946" (DDLW #423)
Describes the surroundings at Maryfarm in Easton, PA: the animals, including the goat genealogy, the workers and the types of services they render,a welcome change in schedule and the new St. Joseph outdoor shrine. Boasts of the visitors,readers of the Catholic Worker, who come to discuss by the hundreds.

1946 April

"Atom Bomb And Conscription Still Issues To Be Faced" (DDLW #422)
Condemns further atomic bomb testing and quotes the New York Times concerning a resolution supporting this view recently introduced in the Senate. Likewise opposes conscription (the draft) and its extension when there is no war as usurpation of authority regarding the destiny of the individual.

1946 May

"On Pilgrimage - May 1946" (DDLW #424)
Reaffirms doing the works of mercy--"It is our program, our rule of life."--and voluntary poverty. Asks us to "consider our daily occupation in the light of a work of mercy." Recommends The Snake Pit, a book about conditions in mental hospitals. Extols gardening.

1946 June

"On Pilgrimage - June 1946" (DDLW #426)
Underscores the importance of Baptismal vows as the foundation of the lay apostolate, including lay retreat houses. Describes an ideal structure for lay communities. Also decries the warehousing of mental patients in "vast concentration camps of human misery." Begs for more men's clothes.

1946 June

"Love Is The Measure" (DDLW #425)
In the face of a world in turmoil--atom bomb tests, food shortages, impending strikes, destitution--an exhortation to "love as Christ loved, to the extent of laying down our lives for our brothers." Tells of a priest whose work made him "a perfect fool for Christ." Says "we confess to being fools and wish we were more so."

1946 July

"On Pilgrimage - July August 1946" (DDLW #427)
Reports on hearing Canon Cardign speak of the Catholic Action movement which is reaching the workers with the Church's social teaching. Endorses non-violence, withdrawal, and getting at the roots in any mass movement. Eulogizes Sidney Hillman for his ground-breaking work in the garment industry. Notes that Peter Maurin received sacramental anointing and requests prayers for a labor leader who stopped practicing his faith. Quotes from Eric Gill's stations of the cross.

1946 September

"The Church and Work" (DDLW #154)
Discusses in length the modern industrial problem of the machine and its relation to factory, land and worker. Explains the C.W.'s attempt to gain the workers back to Christ, by explicating a philosophy of work that distinguishes between those machines that are the extended hand of man and those that make man the extended hand of the machine. Such a philosophy sees people as cooperating with their creator, and to labor is to pray. Criticizes American Catholics for not applying Papal teaching to the work area and shows a particular acrimony to a priest who tell workers to sanctify their surroundings instead of changing it.

1946 September

"On Pilgrimage - September 1946" (DDLW #428)
Surveys the rural area around the Easton, PA, farm from "a distributist point of view" visiting a bookbinder's shop and complaining about polluting factories. Laments that the Catholic Worker hasn't produced more craftsmen. Enumerates all the work projects underway and the schedule of retreats. Joyfully announces the birth of her second grandchild, Susanna.

1946 October

"On Pilgrimage - October 1946" (DDLW #429)
Rambling reflections on workers, the need for saint-revolutionists, monasticism, shared work, living on the land, and Catholic Workers leaving to become priests.

1946 November

"Reflections on Work - November 1946" (DDLW #227)
Emphasizes learning to work with crafts and trades to counter the evils of industrialism--to acquire a philosophy of work. Complains that clergy are too easily "bribed" by business and lauds the work of the French worker priests.

1946 November

"On Pilgrimage - November 1946" (DDLW #226)
Reflects on how hard it is to leave the cares of the Catholic Worker as she begins a pilgrimage to other CW groups. Extols efforts at rural self-sufficiency (e.g. wool making) in St. Joseph, Minnesota, and visits friends in Minneapolis and Chicago.

1946 November

"For These Dear Dead" (DDLW #225)
Six tender obituaries of Workers who had died the past year, each highlighting the person's special qualities. Comments that since "There is no time with God" our prayers for the dead are as if said before their death.

1946 December

"Reflections on Work - December 1946" (DDLW #229)
Reports on the hard life and work of the coal miners of Western Pennsylvania and the strike demands of John L. Lewis. "We want to change man's work; we want to make people question their work; is it on the way to heaven or hell?" Emphasizes the holiness of work and the sacramental quality of property.

1946 December

"On Pilgrimage - December 1946" (DDLW #228)
Describes a visit to Martin de Porres house of hospitality in Harrisburg, Pennsylvania. Reflects on the seeming futility of the work and how "it is undoubtedly a manifestation of love, of God's love."

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1947 January

"Untitled Review of Theology and Sanity" (DDLW #430)
Heartily recommends reading Theology and Sanity by Frank Sheed--to study about God, "this is happiness and joy." Notes that it is theology written by a layman, and the importance of their retreat work in learning to know and love and serve God.

1947 January

"Reflections On Work - January 1947" (DDLW #431)
Quotes Peter Maurin's account of the work of Leon Harmel whose exemplary industrial organization inspired Pope Leo XIII. Praises the Quebec governments homesteading policies. Repeats the need for a philosophy of work and the ideal of the village community. Keywords: distributism, industrialism.

1947 January

"On Pilgrimage - January 1947" (DDLW #432)
The story of a poor family--a pregnant wife and her drug addicted husband--that elicits the prayer "Dear God, help us to increase in holy hope." Reports that Peter Maurin will spend the winter well cared for by friends in Rochester, NY.

1947 February

"On Pilgrimage - February 1947" (DDLW #451)
Attends the wedding of Catholic Workers in Detroit. Visits the widow of Paul St. Marie and recounts his union organizing at Ford Motor Company. Sees Fr. Pacifique Roy, suffering in the hospital, and recalls all his help to the Catholic Worker. Meets Fr. Lacourture whose retreats for priests are the basis of their retreat work.

1947 March

"Reflections On Work - March 1947" (DDLW #452)
Focuses on worker ownership and calls for workers to fight for the means of production, to shun working for the war effort, for priests to come out of their rectories to help the poor, and for all to start the struggle for reform of the social order and against charity growing cold. Repeats the need to be one with the poor and to resist the present social order.

1947 April

"On Pilgrimage - April 1947" (DDLW #453)
The story of Peter Maurin's mysterious four-day disappearance and return from the Worker in New York in the late winter/early spring of 1947.

1947 May

"Letter To Our Readers at the Beginning of Our Fifteenth Year" (DDLW #155)
Outlines P. Maurin's program for social action as the instituting of Houses of Hospitality, Clarification of Thought and Farming Communes, and explains where the C.W. has gone with each program. Reveals Maurin's sources of thought and the need to find lay apostolates. Traces personal sacrifices to Jesus' command in the gospels and asserts that the state cannot take over this duty.

1947 June

"On Pilgrimage - June 1947" (DDLW #454)
Travels by train to the Grail in Ohio, then to the Midwest praising a variety of works of mercy on the land. "A pilgrimage indeed, and a most encouraging one, visiting readers of the paper, families and cells which are growing up everywhere, grappling all of them with the spiritual weapons of hard work, poverty, and prayer."

1947 July

"What Dream Did They Dream? Utopia or Suffering?" (DDLW #456)
A self-critical appraisal of the Catholic Worker movement's first fifteen years. Readily accepts criticism of their ideals of voluntary poverty and pacifism, failure to implement Peter Maurin's vision, of rigorous and demanding retreats, of internal dissent, and of their approach to helping the poor. Says they have not been good servants nor recognized the failure of the cross and the need to die to self. Says they are in a time of transition with only ten houses remaining.

1947 July

"Look Upon The Face of Christ" (DDLW #457)
An unusual midsummer appeal for help. Notes the destitution around them and hopes the "importunity" of their request will be heard.

1947 July

"On Pilgrimage - July/August 1947" (DDLW #458)
Mentions the many parish churches in the neighborhood, the lengthening food line, a grand Italian wedding, and the books she is reading.

1947 September

"On Pilgrimage - September 1947" (DDLW #455)
Highlights the successful summer at the Newburgh farm--crops, retreats, hospitality. Reflects on encouragement in the work and the folly of the cross. Derides flippancy. Describes the environs of her annual retreat and says she is always at home among the poor.

1947 October

"On Pilgrimage - October 1947" (DDLW #459)
Reflection on Peter Maurin's ideas of groups of farming families on the land. Notes the work Fall brings at the farm and describes the community life of Doukhobors, Shakers, and the extinct Ephrata Community. Dismisses the efficiency offered by advertising.

1947 November

"Be Kind, Cain" (DDLW #460)
An apologia for their work in response to a letter questioning their efficacy. She emphasizes strong faith, withholding judgment of the poor, country living, removing fears and the value of indoctrination. Says, "God is love, and perfect love casts out fear."

1947 December

"On Pilgrimage - December 1947" (DDLW #487)
Journeying through Florida, Alabama, and Texas she arrives in California working on a book about Peter Maurin. Along the way comments on factory-farming in Florida and a generous woman's care of the downtrodden, racial violence in Alabama, and the need for lay apostles everywhere. Urges graduates to work in understaffed hospitals and institutions.

1947 December

"Who Then is My Brother?" (DDLW #156)
Defines Christian personalism as "the realization of the dignity of the other fellow, of our obligation to him, the willingness to work with him, on those elements of truth he has seized hold of, accepting his cooperation as far as he will give it, and the refusal to admit disappointment when he doesn't go as far as we think he might." Argues that the Marshall Plan has denied this definition and is an extension of industrial capitalism and abrogates our personal responsibility.

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1948 January

"On Pilgrimage - January 1948" (DDLW #462)
Describes a happy Christmas at the Newburgh farm--snow, good food, worship, but uneven heat. Peter Maurin can't stay warm, receives the affectionate care of children, and needs a doctor. Urges all to keep the ideal of going "villageward."

1948 January

On Pilgrimage (DDLW #5)
States the objectives of the C.W. and defends it against the accusations of other Catholics and secular thought. Writes on such themes as marriage, sex, 10VQ' human condition, poverty, economics and a variety of Church doctrines. All of these topics are treated from an orthodox Catholic point of view. The book is adapted from the diary she kept in 1948, when she spent the first four months with Tamar (daughter) and the rest of the year at Mott street and the retreat farm in Newburgh. She noted that the book could be called a woman's book, since parts of it are directed solely to women. As usual, much of the book dwells on the day to day happenings in her life.

1948 January

"Advent Is A Time of Waiting" (DDLW #866)
Reflects on the role of silence during the liturgical season of Advent as necessary for hearing the Word in our souls. Says it is a time to examine one's conscience and a time "to see only what is loveable."

1948 January

"Letter On Hospices" (DDLW #183)
Describes how Catholic Worker houses are run and the struggles with living the ideal of Christian love. Reflects on reconciling freedom and order. Maintains the primarcy of the spiritual. Gives her positions on cooperation, house leadership, handling money, and the relation of the Catholic Worker to the hierarchy. Concludes by emphasizing the little way and voluntary poverty.

1948 January

On Pilgrimage,
Foreword
(DDLW #475)
Introduces the book as "a woman's book, and for women," dealing "with things of concern to us all, the family, the home, how to live, and what to live and what we live by."

1948 January

On Pilgrimage,
January
(DDLW #476)
Deep in Winter at her daughter's farm in West Virginia they await the birth of Tamar's third child. Reflects on country life and a woman's spirituality in the midst of small children and housework. Describes her efforts at prayer. Reflects on the handicrafts Tamar practices and the worth of a country economy, a way to be co-creators with God. Notes the duty to find joy and resist despair. Long quotes from Eric Gill on a decentralized economy. Keywords: family, poverty, personalism, distributism, capitalism, socialism, communism.

1948 January

On Pilgrimage,
February
(DDLW #477)
Still awaiting Tamar's baby, she mentions neighborly visits and reflects on her family history, and criticizes poorly written books about Mary and the saints. Writes of "feasting and fasting" as Lent begins, enumerating the many mentions of food in the Bible and quoting Dostoevsky's character Father Zossima on the importance of fasting.

1948 January

On Pilgrimage,
April
(DDLW #479)
Ponders the mystery of the love of God for man and man for man. Urges readers to come to their farm for a retreat to renew strength for the apostolate. Express disdain for the Kinsey report on American sexual behavior and presents a sublime vision of sexual love. Includes an extensive passage by Fr. John J. Hugo who himself quotes saints, mystics, scripture, and Church prayers to illustrate how the nuptial union is an analogy of God's love for us.

1948 January

On Pilgrimage,
March
(DDLW #478)
Finally Tamar's son Eric is born. She comments on the child's baptism and the beginning of her own faith. Considers the role of women as nourishers and upbraids herself for being self-indulgent, quoting St. Theresa of Avila at length on penance. As signs of Spring arrive they move to a "new-old" house and she plans to return to New York.

1948 January

On Pilgrimage,
May
(DDLW #480)
Praises God for May, the month of Mary and full of beauty. Recalls the Catholic Worker began in May sixteen years ago and summarizes their program and the many allied movements of the lay apostolate. Says their pacifism and distributism distinguishes them from other movements. Focuses on voluntary poverty as exemplified in Peter Maurin's life, especially since he became ill. Reflects on holiness and the call to all to become saints. Includes quotations from her winter's reading. Keywords: Gandhi, machine, philosophy of work

1948 January

On Pilgrimage,
June
(DDLW #481)
Describes the hustle and bustle around the farm--planting, building, cooking. Ruminates about conversion, calling each person to a revolution beginning with themselves--to make a start toward a new way of living based on distributism. Says distributism is neither communism nor capitalism but based on individual ownership of land, tools, workshops, and factories. Keyword: economics

1948 January

On Pilgrimage,
July - August
(DDLW #482)
Relishes life on the land, saying it is a place to retreat to, find God, and to go forth from as apostles. Summarizes five retreat talks whose focus is to increase the desire for sanctity, to a more complete love of God. Gives examples of her failure to love and the struggle to renew love of God and neighbor.

1948 January

On Pilgrimage,
September
(DDLW #483)
Calls picketing and demonstrating works of mercy--"rebuking the sinner, enlightening the ignorant, counseling the doubtful." Reflects on the challenge of over-mechanization and urges changing over to more "living criteria" for life. Contrasts the noise of New York with the quiet of the farm, a good atmosphere for prayer and reading--"refreshment, light, and peace."

1948 January

On Pilgrimage,
October
(DDLW #484)
Vivid description of the pulsing sounds of worship and smells of death in a black neighborhood in Harrisburg, Pennsylvania. Admires the works of mercy at Mary Frecon's house of hospitality, and example of "the little way." Recalls the wonderful time children had at their labor day retreat and laments their expenses on the farm and for the breadline in the city.

1948 January

On Pilgrimage,
November
(DDLW #485)
An essay and meditation about love in its many forms, human and divine. Quotes scripture, saints, secular writers, and especially Soloviev on love. Concludes that the Catholic Worker is " still trying to work out a theory of love, a study of the problem of love so that the revolution of love instead of that of hate may come about and we will have a new heaven and a new earth wherein justice dwelleth." Includes a poem whose theme is dying and rising. Deeply personal account of being with her dying mother.Includes prayers and meditations on death and dying. Prays to the Little Flower for her mother. Evidence of answered prayer came in a variety of roses from different sources.

1948 January

On Pilgrimage,
December
(DDLW #486)
Meditation on the spiritual weapons of voluntary poverty and manual labor. Lists work to be avoided and personal practices of nonparticipation while exploitation in labor continues. Calls for decentralized living. Recommends growing in acceptance of God's providence and seeing good in others. Reflects on silence during Advent, a time of waitning and a time to examine one's conscience, a time "to see only what is loveable."

1948 February

"We Mourn Death of Gandhi Non Violent Revolutionary" (DDLW #463)
Eulogizes Gandhi as a pacifist martyr and a clear example of "divinized humanity." Sees his death as added to the sacrifice of Christ, sharing in the folly of the cross. Calls his way of non-violence "the full way, because he adhered to an Absolute."

1948 February

"On Pilgrimage - February 1948" (DDLW #464)
Writing from her daughter's farm in West Viriginia, comments on the cold and kid's play. Reports on her travels through the Southwest, Seattle, San Francisco, St. Louis, and Minnesota extolling the need for supporting the family and a return to the land. Distinguishes types of anarchism and the need for study. Wants more priests to have a vision of a new social order.

1948 March

"On Pilgrimage - March 1948" (DDLW #465)
The birth of her third grandchild stimulates reflections on praising God, struggling to change the social order, staying hopeful and trusting in God while suffering. Quotes St. Paul and spiritual writers to bolster her spirit.

1948 April

"We Are Un-American: We Are Catholics" (DDLW #466)
Passionate condemnation of UMT (Universal Military Training) as un-Catholic and atheistic. Advocates Catholics become conscientious objectors. Condemns Americanism and rabid anti-Communism.

1948 April

"On Pilgrimage - April 1948" (DDLW #467)
Meditation on love--our need for love, God's lavish and foolish love, how hard love can be, how others will disapprove of loving the poor, even Lenin and Marx. Urges readers to come to a retreat at Newburgh for renewal and refreshment. Welcomes the Spring warmth and Peter Maurin's coming to the farm.

1948 May

"On Pilgrimage - May 1948" (DDLW #158)
16th anniversary recapitulation of distinctive CW positions, especially pacifism and distributism. Explains the C.W.'s philosophy of labor as serving others. Argues that the problem of unemployment originates from the machine - and advocates Gandhi's economic program. Emphasizes a philosophy of work and a philosophy of poverty.

1948 May

"Without Poverty We Are Powerless" (DDLW #468)
Asserts the importance of voluntary poverty even if it means we are fools for Christ. Then gives a loving appreciation of Peter Maurin's holy poverty, blending light-hearted stories and a graphic description of his dementia and silent suffering. Quotes from Fr. Faber on death in anticipation of Peter's death within a year.

1948 June

"All the Way to Heaven is Heaven" (DDLW #159)
First of a series of articles on distributism (see DOC #160 & DOC #161). Against the backdrop of harsh city life she points to life on the land as a way to find zest in life. Distributism is a third point of view, neither Communism or capitalism. "The aim of distributism is family ownership of land, workshops, stores, transport, trades, professions, and so on." Recommends reading Belloc and Chesterson as an introduction to it.

1948 June

"On Pilgrimage - June 1948" (DDLW #263)
Reports on the planting and variety of produce on the farm at Newburgh, NY, and the repair of two serviceable cars. Describes the plans for turning the barn into a dormitory for mothers and children who are on retreat. In the city, an unexpected death of a neighbor and bouts of measles and chickenpox among the children.

1948 July

"On Pilgrimage - July-August 1948 (DDLW #264)
Contrasts the hustle and bustle around Maryfarm--retreats and visitors--with the quiet life of her daughter Tamar's farm in West Virginia. While peaceful and meditative, rural life often means loneliness, hard work, and poverty.

1948 July

"Articles on Distributism - 2" (DDLW #160)
Argues that distributism is the only alternative to the US economy. Distributism is an alternative to capitalism and socialism built around "the village economy" and a more just distribution of wealth. Quotes four modern Popes in its support. Summarizes its principles with the following Statements: "land is the most natural form of property" "wages should enable man to purchase land" "the family is the most perfect when rooted in its own holdings" "agriculture is the first and most important of all arts." (See also DOC #159 and DOC #161)

1948 September

"On Pilgrimage - September 1948" (DDLW #469)
Opposes registration for conscription and describes their picketing a sign-up site. Notes how easily pickets become violent and her loathing of the use of force. Updates on construction projects and retreat work at Maryfarm.

1948 September

"To Die for Love" (DDLW #470)
An essay and meditation about love in its many forms, human and divine. Quotes scripture, saints, secular writers, and especially Soloviev on love. Concludes that the Catholic Worker is " still trying to work out a theory of love, a study of the problem of love so that the revolution of love instead of that of hate may come about and we will have a new heaven and a new earth wherein justice dwelleth."

1948 October

"The Trial" (DDLW #488)
Attends the trial of Catholic Worker Bob Ludlow who was arrested for picketing with others outside a school. Notes how the judge handles numerous cases of public drunkenness and vagrancy related to homelessness. The judge dismisses the picketers after voicing his opposition to their views. She thinks of Thomas Moore's trial and martyrdom.

1948 October

"On Pilgrimage - October 1948" (DDLW #489)
Describes the joys and struggles of dealing with small children during their family retreat at Newburgh. Notes that they raise a lot of food but still are in debt to the grocer. Asks St. Joseph--"Through you, of course."--to take care of the bill.

1948 October

"Harrisburg Story" (DDLW #490)
Graphic account of Mary Frecons work in a black section of Harrisburg, PA,--the spirited church services, the smell of rats, the care for the dying sick. Emphasizes the unity of body and soul and the need for "blind faith" in such conditions. "How little it all is, as obscure as the life of the Blessed Mother, and as 'little' as the life and sufferings of the Little Flower!"

1948 October

"Notes" (DDLW #491)
Praises the Catholic Arts Quartrly edited by Ade Bethune and says it portrays Peter Maurin's synthesis of Cult, Culture, and Cultivation. Urges readers to buy her books.

1948 November

"On Pilgrimage - November 1948" (DDLW #471)
Briefly summarizes recent Friday night talks at the Catholic Worker on Ireland, worker priests, use of force, and conscientious objection to conscription. Lists many visitors, tells of pleasant days at Maryfarm, and describes conditions in city-run homeless shelters.

1948 December

"On Pilgrimage - December 1948" (DDLW #262)
After a "hullabaloo" of visiting children she mentions talks and inveighs against industrial capitalism. Visits Pittsburgh and Cleveland and lauds hospitality and the works of mercy, the little way and effective way, as the foundation of the work.

1948 December

"On Distributism: Answer to John Cort" (DDLW #161)
Repudiates John Cort and other Catholics who see distributism as an agrarian visionary dream. Quotes from Pius XI, Pius XII and Leo XIII in support of small and medium-sized businesses, employee ownership, and a back to the land movement. Discusses the evils of capitalistic industrialism and urges the long-range plan of distributism. (See DOC #159 and DOC #160)

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1949 January

"On Pilgrimage - January 1949" (DDLW #492)
Contrasts the attitudes of two religious sisters, one impatient and despairing, the other accepting and happy. Noting the fervent love of the early Christians she asks for more generous servants of the poor and sets it as a new year ideal for herself. Appalled at a news report planning for a man-made space satellite for weapons.

1949 February

"On Pilgrimage - February 1949" (DDLW #162)
Discusses Truman's attempt to nationalize steel and argues that it should be permitted as a transition to smaller group ownership, or if private ownership is efficient. Mentions the lack of support for distributism, particularly among Catholics who support government intervention.

1949 April

"On Pilgrimage - April 1949" (DDLW #493)
Upset over the labor conflict between the Archdiocese of New York with its striking cemetery workers, she insists on only non-violent techniques and calls for love to overcome bitterness and resentment. Says Peter Maurin wanted to overcome divisions between clergy and laity. Notes her new book On Pilgrimage "is selling slowly and steadily."

1949 May

"On Pilgrimage - May 1949" (DDLW #261)
May is Mary's month. She prays for a growth in love. Contrasts the teaming city with the peace of the farm at Newburgh where planting, repairs and visiting the sick go on. Lists the summer retreat schedule.

1949 June

"Death of an Apostle" (DDLW #496)
Eulogizes Larry Heaney "the first of the Catholic Worker leaders to die." Called a "saint" by those who knew him, she describes his love of the poor, family life, voluntary poverty, and farming practices.

1949 June

"The Story of Three Deaths - Peter Maurin, Lawrence Heaney, Willie Lurye" (DDLW #495)
A loving obituary for Peter Maurin giving the details of his death and burial. Speaks of his last five years of illness, the day he died, his wake and funeral. Emphasizes the ways "He was another St. Francis of modern times."

1949 July

"Hospices Needed' (DDLW #472)
Praises the liturgical work of Monsignor Hellriegel of St. Louis calling his parish "a fountain of living waters." Calls for more hospices (houses of hospitality) run by the laity. Says the Mass is the foundation for knowing, loving and serving God in the poor.

1949 July

"On Pilgrimage - July-August 1949" (DDLW #164)
Complains of the lack of help from the Church to promote unions. Forcefully explains the difference between communism and the C.W. and contends that the greatest threat to the Church is the working man's ignorance of the Church's social teaching not communism, which is "simply a consequence to the ignorance."

1949 September

"On Pilgrimage - September 1949' (DDLW #473)
Announces a birth and eulogizes a long-time worker, John Anthony Curran. Tells of starting the farm at Newburgh, NY, and all their unpaid bills hoping someone will send money. Thanks readers for condolences on Peter Maurin's death.

1949 October

"On Pilgrimage - October 1949" (DDLW #474)
States St. Therese, the Little Flower, is not a "sentimental" saint but one to "dread" once one gets to know her. Responding to critics, itemizes the cost of Peter Maurin's funeral. Says "We should prepare for death with joy, as for our nuptials." Notes they heard talks on three great Russians: Dostoevsky, Tolstoi, and Soloviev.

1949 October

"Work" (DDLW #165)
Reviews Dom Remhert Sorg's, O.S.B. pamphlet "Towards a Benediction Theology of Manual Labor." Discusses the traditional views of labor from both a philosophical and theological outlook, particularly that of the Egyptian Monks. Also mentions other writers who have contributed to a philosophy of labor.

1949 November

"Beyond Politics" (DDLW #166)
Discusses the C.W.'s means to achieve a better social condition in comparison to communist means. Exhorts "the rich to become poor and the poor to become holy." Criticizes capitalism's unbalanced distribution of wealth and admits a certain compatability exists between Marx and Christianity.

1949 December

"The Case of Father Duffy" (DDLW #497)
Commentary on a case where a priest is silenced for his work with the poor. Expresses the tension of obedience and love of the Church with the demands of serving the poor and Church shortcomings. Affirms her acceptance of Church authority but notes the demands of conscience have caused Saints to be critical of even the Pope in the past. Reaffirms their lay mission to enlighten, arouse the conscience, and lead from the bottom up.

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