The Catholic Worker Movement

Dorothy Day's writings from 1933 to 1939

1933 | 1934 | 1935 | 1936 | 1937 | 1938 | 1939

1933 January

"Confession of Faith" (DDLW #41)
A conversation with her young daughter (Tamar Teresa) about faith in God. Notes the ways liberal relatives influence their children's disbelief and the effects of religious education on Teresa. Argues that faith in God is not unreasonable and that unbelief stems not from lack of reason, but from lack of inquiry.

1933 January

"Communism and the Intellectual" (DDLW #42)
Summarizes the pro-Communist and anti-Capitalist speeches by a group of intellectuals at a symposium whose subject was "Why we vote Communist."

1933 April

"Novena" (DDLW #26)
A fictional account of a fourteen year old girl’s troubles beginning a novena to the Little Flower—St. Therese of Lisieux.

1933 April

"The Diabolic Plot" (DDLW #44)
Points out that many Join the Communist Party with good intentions, such as to better man's human condition, yet many have received no religious training and are not concerned with the Party's anti-religious stance. Gives a short summary of Lenin's attitude toward dealing with Christianity.

1933 May

The Listener - May 1933 (DDLW #934)
A collection of vignettes about the unemployed, union efforts, working conditions, wages, education, companies--"The depression goes on."

1933 May

"To Our Readers" (DDLW #12)
States that the purpose of the paper is to articulate the Church's social program and to popularize the Popes' social encyclicals. Comments on the Communist influence in the Unemployed Councils and on Lenin's pamphlet on religion.

1933 June

"Maurin's Program" (DDLW #266)
Outlines Peter Maurin's three step program of social reconstruction (round table discussions, houses of hospitality, farm colonies) led by the laity working out the principles in the Popes' encyclicals on social justice.

1933 June

"The Listener" (DDLW #267)
Commentary on social conditions of the wealthy J.P. Morgan, of working men and women, and the increasing evictions. Describes the reactions of Communists and others to the initial issue of The Catholic Worker on May 1st.

1933 July

The Listener (DDLW #884)
Notes labor unrest and growing awareness of inequalities in the social system. Lauds doing what one can, quoting saints.

1933 September

"Neighborhood Council In Action" (DDLW #268)
The depression era story of helping a poor woman find and move into a new apartment after being evicted by a heartless landlord for failure to pay rent.

1933 September

"The Listener" (DDLW #269)
Daily chronicle of efforts to organize workers by communists and neighborhood councils. Tells of visitors stopping by to get copies of The Catholic Worker.

1933 October

"Are Newmann Clubs Enough?" (DDLW #270)
Interview with a Jesuit regarding catechesis for Catholic students in public high schools. Quotes a Newman Club worker who complains that the students won't come unless there is a dance.

1933 October

"Is Picketing a Crime?" (DDLW #271)
Unjust injunctions persecute striking workers in New Jersey.

1933 October

"The Listener - October 1933" (DDLW #274)
Miscellaneous musings about child labor, study clubs, mimeographed newspapers issued by altar boys.

1933 October

"All In a Day" (DDLW #272)
Commentary on a parade for labor organizing, labor leaders, strikes around the country, and advertising to increase consumption. Recommends voluntary sacrifices and gifts to the poor. Suggests study clubs use the Gospels, a newspaper, and Papal encyclicals for their material.

1933 November

"Day After Day - November 1933" (DDLW #197)
Contrasts society's concern for animals and sill "high society" games with the plight of those being evicted. Urges readers to petition against evictions.

1933 November

Thanksgiving (DDLW #935)
Expresses gratitude for many contributions as the circulation of the paper has grown to 20,000. There is a melancholy mood with the coming of Winter. Reflects on the price of grapes and how that will affect the Italian wine-makers in the neighborhood. Raises the question of whether Fascism endangers religion.

1933 November

No Continuing City (DDLW #936)
In a fiction-like style, tells a story of Mary Blount, a wife and working-class mother who goes to the city hospital clinic for a prenatal checkup. She begins the day joyfully, but ends experiencing indignity and cruelty from the nurses who fail to listen to her and understand her need for modesty.

1933 November

"Nation-wide Stikes Advance. . ." (DDLW #275)
Accounts of various strikes around the country, the difficulties of labor organizing, and violence against strikers.

1933 December

"Co-operative Apartment for Unemployed Women Has Its Start in Parish" (DDLW #276)
Heralds the opening of a co-operative apartment for ten homeless women and pleads with readers for donations of beds, blankets and sheets.

1933 December

"Catholic Worker Program" (DDLW #277)
Recalls her prayer at the National Shrine of the Immaculate Conception that God show her a way to use her talents to help labor, Peter Maurin's appearance and inspiration, and the notion of personal responsibility--"Every one can help." Thanks all who have supported the work.

1933 December

"Technique of Agitation" (DDLW #198)
Distinguishes The Catholic Worker from other news publications: "The purpose of a paper is to influence the thought of its readers. We are quite frankly propagandists for Catholic Action."

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1934 February

Another Miracle, Please, St. Joseph! (DDLW #937)
After cataloging the "little miracles" of gifts that arrive just in time--blankets, food, clothes, offer of a moose--she asks for bill money. She rejects business approaches to fund raising and says their method comes from the gospel and the "importunity" suggested. They trust they will receive.

1934 March

"Day by Day - March 1934" (DDLW #311)
Writes of efforts to improve race relations and that the "paper is not a paper for black or white, but for the Catholic Worker." Describes examples of hospitality, suffering from cold, and the food they eat.

1934 April

"Days With an End" (DDLW #13)
Repeats P. Maurin's fear that increased state regulation leads to fascism and undermines personal responsibility. However, agrees with Pius XI in his encyclical "Forty Years After", that the state may intervene when a particular group is threatened and no other means are available to them.

1934 May

Thank You! (DDLW #938)
Thanks the readers for gifts to pay the printing bill, and discusses their choice of holy poverty and identification with the workers. Reports the Communist Party's recruitment of African-Americans, and predicts that they will be first to be hurt in any strikes. Describes the joy of the month of May, with the opening up of houses and the fresh sounds and smells of the city.

1934 June

"Why Write About Strife and Violence?" (DDLW #279)
Calls attention to the social crisis, class warfare, and numerous strikes. Notes how Communists practice the corporal works of mercy while lukewarm, comfortable, and indifferent Catholics turn their backs on strikers and their families.

1934 June

"Day by Day - June 1934" (DDLW #278)
Tales of young women struggling to find shelter and work in the midst of economic depression.

1934 July

"Day After Day - July-August 1934" (DDLW #280)
Describes the church and community life of a nearby parish in the midst of a heat wave. Reports on her first meeting with the Interracial Committee and describes the hard realities of Peter Maurin's work in the new office in Harlem.

1934 August

"Letter to an Agnostic" (DDLW #53)
Answers the assertion of a young agnostic that religion is morbid. Recalls the struggle of St. Theresa of Avila as well as her own efforts to find joy in God. Suggests that the arrogance and rebelliousness of youth can deprive the soul of life.

1934 September

"Day After Day - September 1934" (DDLW #281)
A review of summer activities including a children's party held in honor of the Feast of the Assumption, passing out literature, answering inquiries, and the various summer centers hosting lectures. Describes a feisty infant whose antics inspired Peter Maurin to recite the principles of Catholic Action to this "potential recruit." Defends The Catholic Worker's reaction to Rockerfeller's recent donations to Catholic Charities in light of violence in Ludlow, Colorado.

1934 September

"Another Letter to an Agnostic" (DDLW #54)
Witnesses to the authenticity of the Eucharist, and answers the agnostic's objections of religion's cannibalism. Recognizing that the Eucharist is a difficult teaching to accept, she argues that its understanding lies in its simplicity. Christ nourishes through His presence and accomplishes this through the most simple elements of life, bread and wine.

1934 October

"Day After Day - October 1934" (DDLW #282)
Notes the poor women hired as "walking billboards" whose miserable appearance belies the glamour of the products which they advertise. Compares the physical abuse of Catholic Worker pamphleteers to that suffered by Jesus during His Passion. Observes that such treatment deepens our appreciation of Christ's suffering. Summarizes Father Lord's lecture on the differences between Nationalism and Patriotism.

1934 November

"Day After Day - November 1934" (DDLW #283)
Observations about the hardships of Mother Seton, the gift of thirty dozen eggs, the oppression of a steelworker, and an accident befalling three poor boys. Recommends nursery schools so mothers can work and not be separated from their children by the city. A book review of Calverton's The Passing of the Gods which is dismissed as "the shallowest book of the month."

1934 December

"Christmas" (DDLW #199)
Three reflections: a child's view of Christmas, trusting in God to guide one's work, and picketing as passive resistance to injustice.

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1935 January

"Day by Day - January 1935" (DDLW #284)
An account of their work: visitors, helping neighbors, selling copies of the paper. Is grateful for the donations that seem to appear at the most needed times, both money and services. Says they were smote by a flea infestation.

1935 January

Mid-Winter (DDLW #925)
An editorial reaffirming the Mystical Body where suffering or glory for one is shared by all. Notes suffering in Mexico, Spain, and Russia. Says the Catholic Manifesto is the Sermon on the Mount and the remedy is the practice of the physical and spiritual works of mercy. Change begins in our hearts.

1935 February

"A Long Editorial But It Could Be Longer" (DDLW #15)
Traces the program difficulties of Catholic Action to the belief that there is no need for it. Encourages both Communists and Catholics to study the capitalistic system and to compare the similarities and differences in order to raise questions. Sees the need for liturgy and sociology to be linked. Encourages individual responsibility for doing the works of mercy.

1935 February

"Day After Day - February 1935" (DDLW #214)
Notes the many visitors to the Catholic Worker--a Socialist, a bishop, priests, others--small miracles and conversations.

1935 March

"Day After Day - March 1935" (DDLW #286)
Thoughts on Molly Maguires, labor organizing, a visit to the Cathedral in Toronto, the activities of young Communists, and the work of Catherine de Hueck.

1935 April

"Day After Day - April 1935" (DDLW #287)
Description of her daughter's ninth birthday party and the child's Lenten mortifications. Notes the aim of Lent is to keep united to God through the suffering Humanity of His son.

1935 May

"Day After Day - May 1935" (DDLW #288)
Describes house cleaning in preparation for Easter. Catholic workers promulgated Catholic social principles in leaflets and speaking in Union Square at a Communist rally. Notes the work of priests with men on the bowery.

1935 June

"Day After Day - June 1935" (DDLW #289)
Reports on the ongoing work on the garden commune, and how it provides a green sanctuary from the city offices. Transcribes two conversations with the working poor, one from a biscuit factory worker who had been on strike and one from a restaurant worker. Describes her daughter's confirmation and the lovely gift of a hand-printed catechism.

1935 June

"Wealth, The Humanity of Christ, Class War" (DDLW #290)
Working to improve the material conditions of workers is grounded in Christ's humanity and the reality of the Mystical Body. Relying on violence betrays both workers and the brotherhood of man.

1935 July

Security (DDLW #939)
Summary: A passionate rejection of the false security of wages and the maxim "Be moderate, be prudent." Instead she promotes the counsels and precepts of the gospel in this time of world-wide crisis for religion and poverty. She asks, "What right has any one of us to have security when God's poor are suffering?"

1935 July

"Day After Day - July-August 1935" (DDLW #291)
Writes of how people are treated poorly at the Home Relief office. Describes a visit to the garden commune on Staten Island, swims, walks, the inviting smells of plants, and visiting children from Harlem.

1935 September

"Day After Day - September 1935" (DDLW #292)
Describes the working conditions at a power plant and the indignity "clients" experience at the Welfare department.

1935 October

"Day After Day - October 1935" (DDLW #293)
Shares some of the struggles of survival of the early Catholic Worker effort. Rejoices in the birth of a new baby in the community, for whom she and Peter Maurin will serve as godparents. Neighbors and friends have been generous to the Catholic Workers, presenting gifts from food to sacred images. Shares some intimate moments with her daughter, Tamar Teresa.

1935 November

"Day by Day / The Rural Life Conference" (DDLW #294)
Describes a trip to a meeting of the Catholic Rural Life Conference and hopes the movement will revolutionize Catholic thought in America as Lenin's did in Russia. Notes the Catholic Worker's support of such means as adult education, study clubs, forming co-operatives, and propagandizing.

1935 December

"Day by Day Account of Editor's Travels Thru West and North" (DDLW #295)
Tells of a long bus trip and talks in New York, Chicago, Wisconsin, Minnesota, and Canada. Is impressed with the work of Virgil Michel at St. John's College in Minnesota where he has started a school of social studies--"the theory of the personalist revolution must be studied."

1935 December

"Liturgy and Sociology" (DDLW #16)
Distinguishes between individuals in society and persons in society. The former are isolated monads who are "weak and adrift", the latter are a part of a body, (the Body of Christ) which draw strength from each other. The liturgy teaches this unity, which is indispensable for social regeneration.

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1936 January

"The Family vs Capitalism" (DDLW #142)
Explains that the basic unit of society for Catholic sociology is the family, and when the family falls so does Catholicism. This is the reason for hostility to Communism and the same should be true for capitalism, since it creates a class that makes it difficult to sustain a family. Encourages family supportive programs.

1936 January

"To Christ - To the Land" (DDLW #143)
Presents P. Maurin three-point program: Round Table Discussions, Houses of Hospitality, and Farming Communes to further the personalist and communitarian revolution. Promotes worker ownership in order to go back to the land to establish farming communes.

1936 January

"Liturgy and Sociology" (DDLW #296)
Through the Church's liturgical prayer we can overcome individualism and experience universal brotherhood in the Mystical Body of Christ. Once this relationship has been understood, we cannot ignore the suffering of our fellow man. The liturgy is the foundation of the apostolate of the laity.

1936 January

"Day by Day - January 1936" (DDLW #297)
Contrasts the destitution of winter and the spiritual needs for beauty and contemplation. Comments on social organization, strikes, the destitution of winter cold, the thousands fed by the city. Notes the beauty of trees in winter and an art exhibit. Quotes Maritain on beauty and contemplation and appreciates an opera on the radio in spite of truck noise and ringing phones.

1936 February

"Day After Day - February 1936" (DDLW #298)
Heading off by train on a speaking trip she gives a vivid portrayal of the shenanigans in her car. Notes the enthusiastic spreading of the Catholic Worker movement as she meets with groups of Campions and college groups in Pittsburg, Cleveland, Chicago, St. Louis, Kansas City and Wichita.

1936 March

"Sharecropper" (DDLW #60)
Describes her travels with the sharecroppers and the situation with which they are faced. Unions try to organize but planters violently break up meetings and evict those who participate. Depicts the conditions of tent colonies and sickness that exists among those who live there. Advocates distribution of land and farm cooperatives.

1936 April

"Day by Day - April 1936" (DDLW #299)
Admires Communist demonstrators, tells of speaking trips, and appreciates the youth in Kansas for their enthusiasm in learning of social issues.

1936 May

"Pacifism" (DDLW #215)
Outlines The Catholic Worker pacifist position: opposition to class war, imperialist war, and war preparations. Calls for the courage to disarm. "It takes a man of heroic stature to be a pacifist and we urge readers to consider and study pacifism and disarmament in this light."

1936 May

"Catholic Worker Celebrates 3rd Birthday; A Restatement of C. W. Aims and Ideals" (DDLW #300)
Restatement of core Catholic Worker ideals regarding private property, class war, interracial relations, atheism, Marxism, fascism, Communism, materialism, and the role of the state.

1936 June

"Day After Day - June 1936" (DDLW #301)
Life at the farm in Easton, Pennsylvania, described in detail--toil, joys, care of animals. While planting onions she reflects on the plight of migrant workers.

1936 July

C. W. States Stand on Strikes (DDLW #940)
Articulates their position on strikes while eschewing Communist class war tactics and violent means. Supports strikers because of their god-given dignity and the unity of the Mystical Body--"We are members one of another." They aim to change the social order, accept sacrifice and failure, to build the Kingdom of Heaven.

1936 August

"Experiences of C.W. Editor in Steel Towns with C.I.O." (DDLW #302)
Impressions from a fact-finding tour of Pennsylvania steel towns and interviews with such figures as Bishop Boyle of Pittsburgh; John L. Lewis, chairman of the CIO; Kathryn Lewis, his daughter; and John Brophy, Director of the CIO. For readers seeking background information on the steel/labor struggle, she recommends several books. Applauds church and government efforts to support labor in its struggle to organize and notes with satisfaction The CW's ability to transcend race and ethnic boundaries.

Keywords: labor, unions, social teaching

1936 September

"Day After Day - September 1936" (DDLW #304)
Reports on the progress of the lay apostolate, sends out an appeal for used clothing, and thanks a donor who gave her vacation money to the Catholic Worker rather than spend it on a trip to Bermuda. Children and animals continued to thrive on the Easton farm while city included a grand neighborhood fiesta. Reminds us that those who appear to be our enemies are still members of The Mystical Body of Christ.

1936 September

"The Mystical Body and Spain" (DDLW #303)
Wants both sides in the Spanish Civil war to cease their fighting since all are Members of the Mystical Body of Christ. Appeals for prayer and reminds us we are to love our enemies.

1936 October

"Day After Day - October 1936" (DDLW #305)
Encourages parents to begin religious education at home. Admires all the hard work of workers and friends. Notes that they "picketed St. Joseph" for their needs.

1936 November

"The Use of Force" (DDLW #306)
Argues that Christians should not take up arms in the Spanish Civil War. Points to Christ, the Apostles, and martyrs whose willingness to suffer led to victory. Opposes the Communist cry to use force. Prays "give us the courage to suffer."


Keywords: pacifism, non-violence.

1936 November

"Day After Day - November 1936" (DDLW #307)
Reflections on our being children of one Father, thanksgiving, the worth of spreading the "Christian revolution" by distributing the Catholic Worker paper, distributing clothes, and other stories of life on Mott Street.

1936 December

"Houses of Hospitality" (DDLW #308)
Enunciates the principles for starting a house of hospitality. Emphasizes starting small and emphasizing Christian principles. "They [Houses of Hospitality] will emphasize personal action, personal responsibility as opposed to political action and state responsibility."

1936 December

"For the New Reader" (DDLW #310)
Restatement of core Catholic Worker beliefs, distinguishing them from Fascism, Communism, and capitalism. Emphasizes voluntary, private, and personal action to improve the social order.

1936 December

"Day After Day - December 1936" (DDLW #433)
Contrasts the joy at the birth of a calf to the coffee line of poor clad and unemployed men. Delights in symphonic music on the radio, Protestant visitors, and letters supporting their work. Expresses gratitude for gifts and St. Joseph, their householder.

1936 December

"Articles on War and Pacifism" (DDLW #563)
Various articles by Dorothy Day on war, pacifism, and the Catholic Worker positions on making peace.

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1937 January

"Communists Communicate" (DDLW #313)
The Daily Worker, a Communist daily paper, telegraphs The Catholic Worker asking it to denounce "fascist barbarism." The response protests all war, imperialist, civil, or class, whether fascist or bolshevist.

1937 January

"Day After Day - January 1937" (DDLW #314)
Details about caring for workers during the seamens' strike--the need for large amounts of food, space to sleep, illness, high rent, and the threat of violence. Says unions need a supernatural outlook for "without a fatherhood of God, there can be no brotherhood of man."

1937 February

"They Knew Him In The Breaking of Bread" (DDLW #315)
An appeal for money to support the growing breadlines. Describes the lines, cost of feeding so many, the help they receive, and prayers to St. Joseph. Reminds readers that their gifts put them in Christian solidarity with the breadline and what is done for the men is done for Him.

1937 February

"Day After Day - February 1937" (DDLW #316)
A colorful account of a winter morning at the Easton farm--warm fires and cold bedrooms, making butter, the frolics of Bessie the three month old calf. Speaks of guest rooms, hospitality, starting a Catholic lending library, and reading about cooperatives.

1937 March

"C. W. Editor Calls On G. M. Strikers In Plant at Flint" (DDLW #317)
Supports the sit-down strike as a nonviolent tactic in labor organizing. Describes in detail a visit to strikers against General Motors in Flint, Michigan. Notes Communists take advantage of strikes to promote their philosophy of life and calls for Catholics to become "apostles of labor" to reach the masses.

1937 April

"Open Letter to John Brophy, CIO Director" (DDLW #318)
Urges John Brophey, the C.I.O. trade unions director, to use the technique of sit-down strikes, a nonviolent form of coercion, a means used by Gandhi and an example of pure means advocated by Maritain. "The use of force is unchristian."

1937 April

"Day After Day - April 1937" (DDLW #319)
Describes those who deny Christ in His poor as "atheists indeed." Blames well-off "professing Christians" for repelling those with no religion. Quotes from a pamphlet given to the men in the breadline about Christ being their brother and His poverty.

1937 May

"Day After Day - May 1937" (DDLW #321)
Describes the agrarian life at the Easton, Pennsylvania, farm--plans for the barns, a newborn lamb, and the promise of goats. Tells of stopping in Grand Rapids, Michigan, on her way West.

1937 May

"Open Letter to Father Curran On Technique" (DDLW #320)
Exhorts organizers of an anti-Communist rally to stop inciting hate and violence with inflammatory propaganda. Rather, "Forget the negative idea of "fighting Communism," and concentrate on that of building up the Mystical Body of Christ."

Addressed to the Head of International Catholic Truth Society

1937 June

"Day After Day - June 1937" (DDLW #322)
Describes parish life in a South Side Chicago slum, the beautiful liturgy in a St. Louis, Missouri, convent. Speaks to workers, white and colored, and lauds the teaching and hospital work of a 75 year old priest, Fr. John Lyons.

1937 July

"Who is Guilty of 'Murders' in Chicago?" (DDLW #323)
Blames the press and factory owners for inciting police violence against strikers. Relates the suffering of those beaten to Christ's in the garden of Gethsemene. Says we are all guilty for not protesting. Includes some news from the Easton farm.

1937 August

"House Sounder, Paper Smaller, Line The Same" (DDLW #324)
In the midst of house renovation the bread line continues. Says those who oppose helping the destitute have an "atheistic attitude." Appeals for money and describes their "Little Italy" neighborhood.

1937 September

"Farm Colony Larger, Needs Second Farm" (DDLW #325)
Tales of children at the Easton farm, sleeping under a leaking roof, and recent donations. Tells of their prayers to St. Joseph for money to acquire a nearby farm and to build a chapel.

1937 October

Republic Strikers Still Out/Day After Day (DDLW #906)
Supports strikes but not using violence by strikers or company guards. Quotes Norman Thomas on our violent history. Keywords: non-violence, labor

1937 October

Interview With Murphy (DDLW #885)
An interview with the Governor of Michigan and his role in settling strikes and labor disputes in a non-violent way. Highlights his views on lalw and order, but rejection of force and violence. Notes his membership in the Third Order of Franciscans.

1937 November

"No Regrets,' Mooney Tells C. W. Interviewer" (DDLW #326)
Describes a visit to Tom Mooney who was jailed in 1915 for labor organizing and who spends his days caring for infirm inmates in San Quentin prison. Mooney sees Christ as "a great Leader of the workers who set an example of laying down His life for the poor and dispossessed of this world."

1937 December

"California C. W. Groups Starting Right" (DDLW #327)
Tells of the Catholic Worker houses and projects in Los Angelus and San Francisco. Notes the many priests and bishops involved with labor issues and the need for a philosophy of work.

1937 December

"Look On The Face Of Thy Christ" (DDLW #328)
Reflects on the plight of the men on the breadline and the "natural cheerfulness of the moment." Asks readers to help their work of feeding those who represent Christ.

1937 December

"Letter to the Unemployed" (DDLW #188)
Facing the desperation of the Great Depression with hope is difficult. Reminds us of the common laboring life of Christ and the Holy Family. Religion links us in a brotherhood through Christ and is a battle "unto the pulling down of fortifications."

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1938 January

"News from Town and Country" (DDLW #330)
Homey descriptions of life on Mott Street: Christmas gifts received, their needs, a priest who joined the bread line and a wild new year's eve. At the farm, an ice storm creates some adventure and with January comes the peak of winter. Asks prayers for the new year.

1938 January

"Florence Is A Communist" (DDLW #329)
Lauds the courage of a Southern household maid who became a Communist hoping for a better social order. Notes the degradation of cottons workers and prods Catholics to become lay apostles to help build up a new social order.

1938 January

From Union Square to Rome (DDLW #2)
An autobiography written as a letter to her brother John. Conversion story genre of her conversion from Communism to Catholicism. Compiled from articles in America and Preservation of the Faith. Discusses Dostoyevsky's influence on her life and the lonely experience of her conversion Reads as a baptized version of The Eleventh Virgin, with emphasis on her religious experience throughout her life. Expounds on such topics as Eucharist, prayer, Marxism, capitalism, free will and St. Teresa of Avila.

1938 January

From Union Square to Rome,
Introduction
(DDLW #200)
Explains she is writing the book to answer her Communist brother and friend's question: "How could you become a Catholic?"

1938 January

Chapter 1 - Why (DDLW #201)
Considers the difficult task of reflecting on her life and recounting her path to conversion. Some markers along her way included praying the Psalms, reading Dostoyvsky's and Mauriac's novels, and seeing the love of the poor found among those who don't consciously accept Christ. Links her suffering with others to Christ's within His Mystical Body.

1938 January

From Union Square to Rome,
Chapter 2 - Childhood
(DDLW #202)
Recounts her first childhood experiences of discovering God in the Bible, helping others, singing in church, meeting her first Catholic -- ". . .I was filled with lofty ambitions to be a saint, a natural striving, a thrilling recognition of the possibilities of spiritual adventure."

1938 January

From Union Square to Rome,
Chapter 3 - Early Years
(DDLW #203)
Describes her sheltered childhood and her voluminous reading. After being baptized in the Episcopalian Church and loving the services she disavows organized religion as her sense of social justice developles.

1938 January

From Union Square to Rome,
Chapter 4 - College
(DDLW #204)
Recounts her loneliness and poverty at college as well as her conscious turn away from religion. Describes reading Upton Sinclair, Ignazio Silone, Kropotkin, Tolstoi, and Dostoevsky--the latter two allowing her to cling to faith in God. Her yearning grows to struggle with the masses. "Where were the saints to try to change the social order, not just to minister to the slaves but to do away with slavery?"
From Union Square to Rome,
Chapter 5 - Rayna Prohme
(DDLW #205)
An account of the deep friendship with Rayna Prohme whose joyousness and love for truth deeply impressed her. Although Rayna died a Communist, she is counted among those who belong "to the invisible unity of the Church."

1938 January

From Union Square to Rome,
Chapter 6 - New York
(DDLW #206)
Recounts the misery of New York in 1916, her loneliness, and life in tenements among the ethnic poor. Describes her first newspaper job with The Call, the competing social ideologies, and sporadic strikes and protests.

1938 January

From Union Square to Rome,
Chapter 7 - Reporting
(DDLW #207)
Describes her life as an advocacy journalist depicting the misery of the poor and working class. Engages in picketing, organizing, and anti-conscription activities. An account of being jailed with suffragettes and their hunger strike. Theme of being "tormented by God" and impulses toward faith recurs.

1938 January

From Union Square to Rome,
Chapter 8 - The Rigorous LIfe
(DDLW #208)
Describes her year as a nursing student--the long hours, fatigue, and the discipline it brought into her life. She admires the Catholic faith of another student and attends Sunday Mass with her. After a year she realizes "my real work was writing and propaganda" and leaves the hospital for Chicago.

1938 January

From Union Square to Rome,
Chapter 9 - Chicago
(DDLW #209)
Recounts her involvement with the I. W. W. in Chicago and, in some detail, an accidental jail experience. After a move to New Orleans she starts to make "visits" to Church. With the money from selling a book she wrote, she buys a beach house, enters into a common law marriage, and begins to "read and think and ponder, and I notice from my notebooks that it was at this time that I began to pray more earnestly."

1938 January

From Union Square to Rome,
Chapter 10 - Peace
(DDLW #210)
A vivid description of the bucolic life in the beach house on Staten Island. Elaborates on her growing faith and life of prayer, spurred on by the beauty, stillness, and knowledge she is pregnant.

1938 January

From Union Square to Rome,
Chapter 11 - New Life
(DDLW #211)
An account of her final conversion after the birth of her daughter Theresa. She describes the struggle and anguish she felt while preparing for her and Theresa's Baptism--knowing her decision would end her relationship with her agnostic husband.

1938 January

From Union Square to Rome,
Chapter 12 - Wheat And Cockle
(DDLW #212)
Answers the question as to how she rejected Communism. In spite of Communism's good ideals and the faults of Christians, she repudiates Communism as a heresy and rejects its resort to violence in class struggle.

1938 January

From Union Square to Rome,
Chapter 13 - Your Three Objections
(DDLW #213)
Answers three objections of her brother to her faith: that religion is morbid, the Catholic belief in the presence of Christ in the Eucharist, and the problem of evil. Relies on St. Theresa of Avila, St. John of the Cross, and the scriptures to elaborate her faith and love of God.

1938 February

"Of Finances and Personal Initiative" (DDLW #145)
Explains the C.W.'s perpetual necessity to help the poor. Objects when states responsibility impedes personal responsibility. Calls her readers to have a Christ room in their homes, hospices in poor parishes and coffee lines for the transients, in order to exercise personal responsibility.

1938 March

"Valiant Is The Word" (DDLW #332)
Admires the heroic sacrifice and hard work of Iola Ellis in helping her sister's daughters get an education. Advocates educational rights for Negroes so they can become leaders.

1938 March

"Day After Day - More Houses of Hospitality Are Needed" (DDLW #331)
Calls for every parish to have a Works of Mercy Center and for courage in doing the little immediate jobs of feeding the hungry and giving out literature. (Notes St. Therese's "little way.") Encourages discussion groups and round table discussions for the clarification of thought.

1938 March

Chicago Readers (DDLW #907)
Appeals for help at a new house of hospitality in Chicago.

1938 April

"Distinguished Visitors Mark Past Month" (DDLW #333)
Another appeal has gone out entrusting their needs to St. Joseph. Notes how busy everyone is at the office, on the breadline, and on the farm. (Someone had noted the hordes of young men around the CW and wondered what they do.) Mentions that public works such as bridge building can be considered works of mercy.

1938 May

"Detroit C. W. Is Model of Hospitality" (DDLW #334)
Praises the hospitality at the Detroit Catholic Worker and tells of police violence against picketers on strike. Describes a night spent at a bleak Salvation Army shelter.

1938 June

"News of C. W. Groups Given By Editor" (DDLW #335)
A series of stories about the work of Catholic Worker groups she recently visited on a speaking trip: Portsmouth and Newport, RI; Boston and Worchester, MA; Milwaukee; Chicago; Rochester, NY; Detroit; and Pittsburgh.

1938 July

Bills and Things--Day After Day (DDLW #908)
Reports on the current worsening employment conditions in the country, and the concomitant need to send out another appeal for funds, even though it is summer. Gives an account of the communal work on the farm, and the problems of bills and the need for help during the canning season.

1938 September

"Explains CW Stand on Use of Force" (DDLW #216)
Clarifies the Catholic Worker position regarding the war in Spain, opposing violence as a solution. Urges prayer for peace, love instead of violence, and preparation for martyrdom.

1938 September

"C.W. Editor Back from Nova Scotia" (DDLW #146)
Describes her trip to Antigonish, Nova Scotia and her stay with the community. Discusses her meeting with the United Mine Workers and how cooperative stores there have built a spiritual foundation for their material needs distribution. Comments on the community's independence and its inter-dependence on one other.

1938 October

"Visitors Criticism, CIO Convention" (DDLW #336)
Collection of little stories: visitors, helping Tamar with homework, praying to St. Joseph for money, reading Pelle the Conqueror, and attending a CIO convention. Affirms her "faith in the tremendous spiritual capacities of man."

1938 October

"Farming Commune" (DDLW #337)
Relishes the progress of the farm in Easton after two and a half years. Says they are applying "the principles of the personalist and communitarian revolution" and urges unused land owned by the Church be used in imitation of their efforts.

1938 December

"Day After Day - December 1938" (DDLW #338)
Attends a dinner in honor of Raissa Maritain and takes her to a jazz club in Harlem. Compares the Mott Street neighborhood to a village with small shops, sweet smells, generosity, troubles, pets. Asks if someone can send a hedgehog to her daughter.

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1939 January

"Day After Day - January 1939" (DDLW #339)
An open letter to Peter Maurin, who is travelling, conveying the latest news from New York--visitors, news of strikes, conversations, and a needs list for the farm. Says their work is for a pluralist order, for the common good seeking concordances with others' points of view.

1939 January

House of Hospitality (DDLW #3)
An account of the first five years of the Catholic Worker (C.W.). Describes the C.W. not simply as a newspaper but as a movement. Explicates its position on labor and unions through Peter Maurin's ideas on personalism. Much of the book, however, is taken up with the day to day experiences of the C.W., describing the soup lines, publication of the paper, picketing, farm communes, and the finances of the C.W.

1939 February

House of Hospitality,
Foreword
(DDLW #435)
An overview of the beginnings of the Catholic Worker. As a journalist covering the Communist led march on Washington in December 1932, Dorothy yearns and prays to find a way to work for the poor and oppressed. She meeets Peter Maurin who "indoctrinates" her in Catholic social teaching and his program to change the social order: starting a newspaper, houses of hospitality, roundtable discussions and farming communes. Includes several of Peter's essays and details about starting the newspaper and their first houses of hospitality.

1939 February

"Complains of Organized Charity, Cops" (DDLW #340)
Describes the ordeal of trying to find a bed for a two and a half year old child on a cold Winter night and the indignity they faced at the hands of the police. Finally, she gives her and her daughter Tamar's beds to the boy and his father.

1939 February

House of Hospitality,
Chapter One
(DDLW #436)
Engaging vignettes about the daily work of the early depression era movement: helping the evicted, street corner speaking, the impersonal shelters run by the city, and the delightful conversation of children around the office.

1939 February

House of Hospitality,
Chapter Two
(DDLW #437)
Vignettes about a mentally ill woman disturbing the neighborhood and the good luck and hard work life of a friend. Describes their struggles with food, lack of money, heated discussions, children's play, "little miracles," selling the paper at a nearby church, and the constant interruptions. Notes two kinds of materialism.

1939 February

House of Hospitality,
Chapter Three
(DDLW #438)
Tales of hospitality, distributing the paper, and propaganda meetings. Affirms the primacy of performing the works of mercy over "talking and writing about the work." Quotes from Frederick Ozanam on putting faith into action. Describes homey scenes at the beach house with Theresa and their beachcomber friend Smiddy. Tells of their poverty and their joy amid their city neighbors, a busy parish Church nearby, and Peter's efforts in Harlem.

1939 February

House of Hospitality,
Chapter Four
(DDLW #439)
A mixture of colorful stories of guests' travails, daily tasks, and small pleasures. Includes a Peter Maurin presentation on Socialism's faults and the need for action based on a supernatural foundation. Reflects on St. Therese's Little Way as a way to overcome discouragement.

1939 February

House of Hospitality,
Chapter Five
(DDLW #440)
Describes the seemingly endless stream of donations, visitors, and people in need that fill the long winter days and make writing difficult. Points to bits of humor and scenes of natural beauty that refresh the soul. Notes their bittersweet good fortune in moving to a larger but less expensive house.

1939 February

House of Hospitality,
Chapter Six
(DDLW #441)
Struggles with discouragement and turns to prayer and spiritual reading for courage. Includes quotes from various spiritual writers. Tales from the farm and trips to the Home Relief Office, swims to escape the oppressive heat, and sweet smells. Rejects the notion that all are not called to perfection and sees true security in giving ones talents in the service of the poor. Details their debt and asserts their insecurity is good.

1939 February

House of Hospitality,
Chapter Seven
(DDLW #442)
Fighting melancholy and overwork she wavers between justifying and blaming herself. Includes a mock dialogue with a "Critical Inquirer," examples of their arguments and conflicts, and sustaining quotes from spiritual writers. Sets a rule of life for herself and affirms that "those circumstances which surround us are the very ones God wills for us."

1939 February

House of Hospitality,
Chapter Eight
(DDLW #443)
After describing their search for a farm and the move to Mott Street, most of the chapter is a clarification of why they support organizing and striking workers. Contrasts their peaceful methods with the communist calls for violence in a class war. Asserts a spiritual foundation based on the dignity of man, a philosophy of labor, and the unity of the Mystical Body of Christ. Wants workers to become owners and lauds the cooperative and back-to-the-land movements.

1939 February

House of Hospitality,
Chapter Nine
(DDLW #444)
A summer full of trips between the Easton farm and the city, she vividly chronicles the flurry of activity that seemingly accomplishes a great deal. Struggles with issues of freedom, personal responsibility, and her role in the movement. Feels "utterly lacking, ineffective."

1939 February

House of Hospitality,
Chapter Ten
(DDLW #445)
Expresses deep gratitude to God for the goodness of their first summer at the Easton farm. Explains why they distribute The Catholic Worker and Catholic literature at Communist rallies. Meditates on the phrase "Our Father" as the basis for understanding that all men are brothers. A long description of their efforts to help the striking seamen in New York.

1939 February

House of Hospitality,
Chapter Eleven
(DDLW #446)
Bucolic description of the antics of Bessie the calf. Much of the chapter describes her visit to the sit-down strike in Flint, Michigan, against General Motors and their tactics. Says labor in the U.S. needs a long range program of education about cooperatives, credit unions, and a philosophy of labor. Quotes from a leaflet distributed to the men on the breadline inviting them to attend a parish mission. After a talk to a women's club in Florida she observes that the rich who deny Christ in His poor "are atheists indeed."

1939 February

House of Hospitality,
Chapter Twelve
(DDLW #447)
Contrasts the violence against strikers in Chicago at the Republic Steel Mills, egged on by the media, with the peaceful methods of dealing with strikers by law enforcement officials in Johnstown, Pennsylvania. Comments on the joyful antics of the many children at the farm in the Summer, and enumerates their many unmet needs at the farm. Describes the noisy rebuilding going on at Mott Street. On the road, she reports on housing efforts in Chicago and a beautiful liturgy in St. Louis, explaining why they say Compline in New York.

1939 February

House of Hospitality,
Chapter Thirteen
(DDLW #448)
On speaking trips to California, Florida, and Alabama, she notes the many places she spoke to labor groups, the projects of many lay people, priests, and sisters, and a visit with the anti-union president of a steel mill. Describes the death and funeral of a seaman who lived at the Catholic Worker. Reiterates the principles of their work: smallness, giving shelter to the homeless, indoctrination, personal responsibility, teaching cooperation and mutual aid, and relying on God--"Unless the Lord build the house, they labor in vain that build it. Recommends several books.

1939 February

House of Hospitality,
Chapter Fourteen
(DDLW #449)
An account of struggling with agencies and suspicious police to find a room for a small child. A reflection of Christ's sufferings, borne for all who suffer now, and the realization that "suffering and death can no longer be victorious." Discusses the problem of dissension and self-criticism in the movement, reproaching herself and her own sinfulness. Notes how hard their work is and that change comes slowly. Asserts that "Love and ever more love is the only solution to every problem that comes up."

1939 February

House of Hospitality,
Conclusion
(DDLW #450)
Reflecting on the themes cover in the book, she acknowledges all that has been accomplished and distinguishes the role of the State and personal responsibility. Enumerates the many strikes they supported. Calls for a greater use of prayer and the desire to be saints. Speaks about what individual workers are doing in New York and is encouraged by houses around the country. Concludes by recalling Peter Maurin's fundamental ideas--voluntary poverty and the works of mercy. Prays that they continue on "the downward path which leads to salvation."

1939 March

"Day After Day - March 1939" (DDLW #341)
Describes a mission being preached in a nearby Church. Feels love for the poor ones in attendance seeing them as brothers of Christ. Explains why she prays for those who have committed suicide. Makes an appeal for funds.

1939 May

"House of Hospitality" (DDLW #342)
A detailed account of the first houses of hospitality in New York where the works of mercy, prayer, work, and community intermingle.

1939 June

"Open Letter to Peter Maurin From Editor" (DDLW #343)
An open letter to Peter Maurin telling him of the latest developments during one of his prolonged absences from the New York area. There were some tragedies--her father and Mr. Breen died and Charlie the bricklayer collapsed. Many members of the team fell ill. Yet there was also joy to share--progress continued on the Easton farm and interest in The Catholic Worker movement grew both at home and abroad. Most importantly, the various workers' children brought amusement and joy into everyone's lives.

1939 July

"About Many Things in N. Y. And on Farm" (DDLW #344)
A collection of "odds and ends of things that happen around the Catholic Worker:" cleaning, weddings and births, the activities of the Mott Street office, CW's correspondence, a day at Maryknoll, the Easton farm, and her plans for some recently donated property on Staten Island. Notes "To live with children around is good for the spirit."

1939 September

"C. W. Retreat" (DDLW #345)
Points to Christ's example of getting away from the multitudes and the importance of finding Him for their work. Notes that a three day silent retreat attended by people from 15 Catholic Worker houses has led to a their renewed sense of strength, unity, and purpose.

1939 September

"Funds Needed To Carry On Work in N. Y." (DDLW #346)
Meditates on the virtues of voluntary poverty and the difference between decent poverty and destitution. Describes their poor circumstances and appeals for money to carry on the work. Also notes that life on Mott Street provides diversion and, sometimes, real joy.

1939 October

"San Gennaro Festa Scene On Mott St." (DDLW #348)
Writes of a time of fasts and feasts--Orthodox Jews observing the Day of Atonement while their Italian neighbors continued to celebrate the Feast of San Gennaro. Tragedy marred the celebration--a drunken fight resulted in the fatal stabbing of a participant. While visiting with her neighbors during the fiesta, she reflects upon the hardships in her neighbors' lives, the acceptance with which they endured their poverty, and the enthusiasm with which they embraced the simple pleasures which came their way.

1939 October

"To The Workers" (DDLW #347)
An impassioned appeal to American workers asking them not to participate in the production of goods which will be used to wage war. She reminds workers of their power and begs them to unite and again sacrifice to further international truth and justice, not mass killing and destruction.

1939 November

"War Plans Taken With Awful Calm" (DDLW #350)
Reports on the growth of C.W., new houses, the newspaper's circulation, and various projects. Assesses the employment situation and the country's willingness to mobilize for war and the making of profit. Expresses gratitude for the people who have answered their appeal and have continued to make the C.W.'s ministry possible. Amidst talk of war and peace " It would be hard to keep a cheerful spirit in the face of the calm acceptance of this preparation for mass slaughter and insanity if it were not for our faith."

1939 November

"Untitled Review of 'A Christian Looks at the Jewish Question'" (DDLW #349)
Reviews Jacques Maritain's book, A Christian Looks at the Jewish Question. Quotes from the book extensively agreeing with his denunciation of anti-Semitism in Europe, a call for better emigration policies, and using "the real power of love and truth even over political and social relations."

Keywords: anti-Semitism, racism, truth, justice

1939 December

"Thanksgiving Dinner and Other Things" (DDLW #351)
Describes their Thanksgiving feast. Despite the fact that donations were sparse, all enjoy a filling, yet sober, celebration. Notes the beginning of Advent and thoughts of feasting turn to fasting. Describes her speaking tour of New England, meditates on the virtues of manual labor, and reminds her readers that the truckmen of Burlington are suffering real privation during their strike.

1933 January

"Confession of Faith" (DDLW #41)
A conversation with her young daughter (Tamar Teresa) about faith in God. Notes the ways liberal relatives influence their children's disbelief and the effects of religious education on Teresa. Argues that faith in God is not unreasonable and that unbelief stems not from lack of reason, but from lack of inquiry.

1933 January

"Communism and the Intellectual" (DDLW #42)
Summarizes the pro-Communist and anti-Capitalist speeches by a group of intellectuals at a symposium whose subject was "Why we vote Communist."

1933 April

"The Diabolic Plot" (DDLW #44)
Points out that many Join the Communist Party with good intentions, such as to better man's human condition, yet many have received no religious training and are not concerned with the Party's anti-religious stance. Gives a short summary of Lenin's attitude toward dealing with Christianity.

1933 May

The Listener - May 1933 (DDLW #934)
A collection of vignettes about the unemployed, union efforts, working conditions, wages, education, companies--"The depression goes on."

1933 May

"To Our Readers" (DDLW #12)
States that the purpose of the paper is to articulate the Church's social program and to popularize the Popes' social encyclicals. Comments on the Communist influence in the Unemployed Councils and on Lenin's pamphlet on religion.

1933 June

"The Listener" (DDLW #267)
Commentary on social conditions of the wealthy J.P. Morgan, of working men and women, and the increasing evictions. Describes the reactions of Communists and others to the initial issue of The Catholic Worker on May 1st.

1933 June

"Maurin's Program" (DDLW #266)
Outlines Peter Maurin's three step program of social reconstruction (round table discussions, houses of hospitality, farm colonies) led by the laity working out the principles in the Popes' encyclicals on social justice.

1933 July

The Listener (DDLW #884)
Notes labor unrest and growing awareness of inequalities in the social system. Lauds doing what one can, quoting saints.

1933 September

"The Listener" (DDLW #269)
Daily chronicle of efforts to organize workers by communists and neighborhood councils. Tells of visitors stopping by to get copies of The Catholic Worker.

1933 September

"Neighborhood Council In Action" (DDLW #268)
The depression era story of helping a poor woman find and move into a new apartment after being evicted by a heartless landlord for failure to pay rent.

1933 October

"The Listener - October 1933" (DDLW #274)
Miscellaneous musings about child labor, study clubs, mimeographed newspapers issued by altar boys.

1933 October

"All In a Day" (DDLW #272)
Commentary on a parade for labor organizing, labor leaders, strikes around the country, and advertising to increase consumption. Recommends voluntary sacrifices and gifts to the poor. Suggests study clubs use the Gospels, a newspaper, and Papal encyclicals for their material.

1933 October

"Is Picketing a Crime?" (DDLW #271)
Unjust injunctions persecute striking workers in New Jersey.

1933 October

"Are Newmann Clubs Enough?" (DDLW #270)
Interview with a Jesuit regarding catechesis for Catholic students in public high schools. Quotes a Newman Club worker who complains that the students won't come unless there is a dance.

1933 November

"Nation-wide Stikes Advance. . ." (DDLW #275)
Accounts of various strikes around the country, the difficulties of labor organizing, and violence against strikers.

1933 November

"Day After Day - November 1933" (DDLW #197)
Contrasts society's concern for animals and sill "high society" games with the plight of those being evicted. Urges readers to petition against evictions.

1933 November

Thanksgiving (DDLW #935)
Expresses gratitude for many contributions as the circulation of the paper has grown to 20,000. There is a melancholy mood with the coming of Winter. Reflects on the price of grapes and how that will affect the Italian wine-makers in the neighborhood. Raises the question of whether Fascism endangers religion.

1933 November

No Continuing City (DDLW #936)
In a fiction-like style, tells a story of Mary Blount, a wife and working-class mother who goes to the city hospital clinic for a prenatal checkup. She begins the day joyfully, but ends experiencing indignity and cruelty from the nurses who fail to listen to her and understand her need for modesty.

1933 December

"Catholic Worker Program" (DDLW #277)
Recalls her prayer at the National Shrine of the Immaculate Conception that God show her a way to use her talents to help labor, Peter Maurin's appearance and inspiration, and the notion of personal responsibility--"Every one can help." Thanks all who have supported the work.

1933 December

"Co-operative Apartment for Unemployed Women Has Its Start in Parish" (DDLW #276)
Heralds the opening of a co-operative apartment for ten homeless women and pleads with readers for donations of beds, blankets and sheets.

1933 December

"Technique of Agitation" (DDLW #198)
Distinguishes The Catholic Worker from other news publications: "The purpose of a paper is to influence the thought of its readers. We are quite frankly propagandists for Catholic Action."

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1934 February

Another Miracle, Please, St. Joseph! (DDLW #937)
After cataloging the "little miracles" of gifts that arrive just in time--blankets, food, clothes, offer of a moose--she asks for bill money. She rejects business approaches to fund raising and says their method comes from the gospel and the "importunity" suggested. They trust they will receive.

1934 March

"Day by Day - March 1934" (DDLW #311)
Writes of efforts to improve race relations and that the "paper is not a paper for black or white, but for the Catholic Worker." Describes examples of hospitality, suffering from cold, and the food they eat.

1934 April

"Days With an End" (DDLW #13)
Repeats P. Maurin's fear that increased state regulation leads to fascism and undermines personal responsibility. However, agrees with Pius XI in his encyclical "Forty Years After", that the state may intervene when a particular group is threatened and no other means are available to them.

1934 May

Thank You! (DDLW #938)
Thanks the readers for gifts to pay the printing bill, and discusses their choice of holy poverty and identification with the workers. Reports the Communist Party's recruitment of African-Americans, and predicts that they will be first to be hurt in any strikes. Describes the joy of the month of May, with the opening up of houses and the fresh sounds and smells of the city.

1934 June

"Day by Day - June 1934" (DDLW #278)
Tales of young women struggling to find shelter and work in the midst of economic depression.

1934 June

"Why Write About Strife and Violence?" (DDLW #279)
Calls attention to the social crisis, class warfare, and numerous strikes. Notes how Communists practice the corporal works of mercy while lukewarm, comfortable, and indifferent Catholics turn their backs on strikers and their families.

1934 July

"Day After Day - July-August 1934" (DDLW #280)
Describes the church and community life of a nearby parish in the midst of a heat wave. Reports on her first meeting with the Interracial Committee and describes the hard realities of Peter Maurin's work in the new office in Harlem.

1934 August

"Letter to an Agnostic" (DDLW #53)
Answers the assertion of a young agnostic that religion is morbid. Recalls the struggle of St. Theresa of Avila as well as her own efforts to find joy in God. Suggests that the arrogance and rebelliousness of youth can deprive the soul of life.

1934 September

"Day After Day - September 1934" (DDLW #281)
A review of summer activities including a children's party held in honor of the Feast of the Assumption, passing out literature, answering inquiries, and the various summer centers hosting lectures. Describes a feisty infant whose antics inspired Peter Maurin to recite the principles of Catholic Action to this "potential recruit." Defends The Catholic Worker's reaction to Rockerfeller's recent donations to Catholic Charities in light of violence in Ludlow, Colorado.

1934 September

"Another Letter to an Agnostic" (DDLW #54)
Witnesses to the authenticity of the Eucharist, and answers the agnostic's objections of religion's cannibalism. Recognizing that the Eucharist is a difficult teaching to accept, she argues that its understanding lies in its simplicity. Christ nourishes through His presence and accomplishes this through the most simple elements of life, bread and wine.

1934 October

"Day After Day - October 1934" (DDLW #282)
Notes the poor women hired as "walking billboards" whose miserable appearance belies the glamour of the products which they advertise. Compares the physical abuse of Catholic Worker pamphleteers to that suffered by Jesus during His Passion. Observes that such treatment deepens our appreciation of Christ's suffering. Summarizes Father Lord's lecture on the differences between Nationalism and Patriotism.

1934 November

"Day After Day - November 1934" (DDLW #283)
Observations about the hardships of Mother Seton, the gift of thirty dozen eggs, the oppression of a steelworker, and an accident befalling three poor boys. Recommends nursery schools so mothers can work and not be separated from their children by the city. A book review of Calverton's The Passing of the Gods which is dismissed as "the shallowest book of the month."

1934 December

"Christmas" (DDLW #199)
Three reflections: a child's view of Christmas, trusting in God to guide one's work, and picketing as passive resistance to injustice.

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1935 January

Mid-Winter (DDLW #925)
An editorial reaffirming the Mystical Body where suffering or glory for one is shared by all. Notes suffering in Mexico, Spain, and Russia. Says the Catholic Manifesto is the Sermon on the Mount and the remedy is the practice of the physical and spiritual works of mercy. Change begins in our hearts.

1935 January

"Day by Day - January 1935" (DDLW #284)
An account of their work: visitors, helping neighbors, selling copies of the paper. Is grateful for the donations that seem to appear at the most needed times, both money and services. Says they were smote by a flea infestation.

1935 February

"A Long Editorial But It Could Be Longer" (DDLW #15)
Traces the program difficulties of Catholic Action to the belief that there is no need for it. Encourages both Communists and Catholics to study the capitalistic system and to compare the similarities and differences in order to raise questions. Sees the need for liturgy and sociology to be linked. Encourages individual responsibility for doing the works of mercy.

1935 February

"Day After Day - February 1935" (DDLW #214)
Notes the many visitors to the Catholic Worker--a Socialist, a bishop, priests, others--small miracles and conversations.

1935 March

"Day After Day - March 1935" (DDLW #286)
Thoughts on Molly Maguires, labor organizing, a visit to the Cathedral in Toronto, the activities of young Communists, and the work of Catherine de Hueck.

1935 April

"Day After Day - April 1935" (DDLW #287)
Description of her daughter's ninth birthday party and the child's Lenten mortifications. Notes the aim of Lent is to keep united to God through the suffering Humanity of His son.

1935 May

"Day After Day - May 1935" (DDLW #288)
Describes house cleaning in preparation for Easter. Catholic workers promulgated Catholic social principles in leaflets and speaking in Union Square at a Communist rally. Notes the work of priests with men on the bowery.

1935 June

"Day After Day - June 1935" (DDLW #289)
Reports on the ongoing work on the garden commune, and how it provides a green sanctuary from the city offices. Transcribes two conversations with the working poor, one from a biscuit factory worker who had been on strike and one from a restaurant worker. Describes her daughter's confirmation and the lovely gift of a hand-printed catechism.

1935 June

"Wealth, The Humanity of Christ, Class War" (DDLW #290)
Working to improve the material conditions of workers is grounded in Christ's humanity and the reality of the Mystical Body. Relying on violence betrays both workers and the brotherhood of man.

1935 July

"Day After Day - July-August 1935" (DDLW #291)
Writes of how people are treated poorly at the Home Relief office. Describes a visit to the garden commune on Staten Island, swims, walks, the inviting smells of plants, and visiting children from Harlem.

1935 July

Security (DDLW #939)
Summary: A passionate rejection of the false security of wages and the maxim "Be moderate, be prudent." Instead she promotes the counsels and precepts of the gospel in this time of world-wide crisis for religion and poverty. She asks, "What right has any one of us to have security when God's poor are suffering?"

1935 September

"Day After Day - September 1935" (DDLW #292)
Describes the working conditions at a power plant and the indignity "clients" experience at the Welfare department.

1935 October

"Day After Day - October 1935" (DDLW #293)
Shares some of the struggles of survival of the early Catholic Worker effort. Rejoices in the birth of a new baby in the community, for whom she and Peter Maurin will serve as godparents. Neighbors and friends have been generous to the Catholic Workers, presenting gifts from food to sacred images. Shares some intimate moments with her daughter, Tamar Teresa.

1935 November

"Day by Day / The Rural Life Conference" (DDLW #294)
Describes a trip to a meeting of the Catholic Rural Life Conference and hopes the movement will revolutionize Catholic thought in America as Lenin's did in Russia. Notes the Catholic Worker's support of such means as adult education, study clubs, forming co-operatives, and propagandizing.

1935 December

"Day by Day Account of Editor's Travels Thru West and North" (DDLW #295)
Tells of a long bus trip and talks in New York, Chicago, Wisconsin, Minnesota, and Canada. Is impressed with the work of Virgil Michel at St. John's College in Minnesota where he has started a school of social studies--"the theory of the personalist revolution must be studied."

1935 December

"Liturgy and Sociology" (DDLW #16)
Distinguishes between individuals in society and persons in society. The former are isolated monads who are "weak and adrift", the latter are a part of a body, (the Body of Christ) which draw strength from each other. The liturgy teaches this unity, which is indispensable for social regeneration.

1936 January

"The Family vs Capitalism" (DDLW #142)
Explains that the basic unit of society for Catholic sociology is the family, and when the family falls so does Catholicism. This is the reason for hostility to Communism and the same should be true for capitalism, since it creates a class that makes it difficult to sustain a family. Encourages family supportive programs.

1936 January

"To Christ - To the Land" (DDLW #143)
Presents P. Maurin three-point program: Round Table Discussions, Houses of Hospitality, and Farming Communes to further the personalist and communitarian revolution. Promotes worker ownership in order to go back to the land to establish farming communes.

1936 January

"Liturgy and Sociology" (DDLW #296)
Through the Church's liturgical prayer we can overcome individualism and experience universal brotherhood in the Mystical Body of Christ. Once this relationship has been understood, we cannot ignore the suffering of our fellow man. The liturgy is the foundation of the apostolate of the laity.

1936 January

"Day by Day - January 1936" (DDLW #297)
Contrasts the destitution of winter and the spiritual needs for beauty and contemplation. Comments on social organization, strikes, the destitution of winter cold, the thousands fed by the city. Notes the beauty of trees in winter and an art exhibit. Quotes Maritain on beauty and contemplation and appreciates an opera on the radio in spite of truck noise and ringing phones.

1936 February

"Day After Day - February 1936" (DDLW #298)
Heading off by train on a speaking trip she gives a vivid portrayal of the shenanigans in her car. Notes the enthusiastic spreading of the Catholic Worker movement as she meets with groups of Campions and college groups in Pittsburg, Cleveland, Chicago, St. Louis, Kansas City and Wichita.

1936 March

"Sharecropper" (DDLW #60)
Describes her travels with the sharecroppers and the situation with which they are faced. Unions try to organize but planters violently break up meetings and evict those who participate. Depicts the conditions of tent colonies and sickness that exists among those who live there. Advocates distribution of land and farm cooperatives.

1936 April

"Day by Day - April 1936" (DDLW #299)
Admires Communist demonstrators, tells of speaking trips, and appreciates the youth in Kansas for their enthusiasm in learning of social issues.

1936 May

"Pacifism" (DDLW #215)
Outlines The Catholic Worker pacifist position: opposition to class war, imperialist war, and war preparations. Calls for the courage to disarm. "It takes a man of heroic stature to be a pacifist and we urge readers to consider and study pacifism and disarmament in this light."

1936 May

"Catholic Worker Celebrates 3rd Birthday; A Restatement of C. W. Aims and Ideals" (DDLW #300)
Restatement of core Catholic Worker ideals regarding private property, class war, interracial relations, atheism, Marxism, fascism, Communism, materialism, and the role of the state.

1936 June

"Day After Day - June 1936" (DDLW #301)
Life at the farm in Easton, Pennsylvania, described in detail--toil, joys, care of animals. While planting onions she reflects on the plight of migrant workers.

1936 July

C. W. States Stand on Strikes (DDLW #940)
Articulates their position on strikes while eschewing Communist class war tactics and violent means. Supports strikers because of their god-given dignity and the unity of the Mystical Body--"We are members one of another." They aim to change the social order, accept sacrifice and failure, to build the Kingdom of Heaven.

1936 August

"Experiences of C.W. Editor in Steel Towns with C.I.O." (DDLW #302)
Impressions from a fact-finding tour of Pennsylvania steel towns and interviews with such figures as Bishop Boyle of Pittsburgh; John L. Lewis, chairman of the CIO; Kathryn Lewis, his daughter; and John Brophy, Director of the CIO. For readers seeking background information on the steel/labor struggle, she recommends several books. Applauds church and government efforts to support labor in its struggle to organize and notes with satisfaction The CW's ability to transcend race and ethnic boundaries.

Keywords: labor, unions, social teaching

1936 September

"Day After Day - September 1936" (DDLW #304)
Reports on the progress of the lay apostolate, sends out an appeal for used clothing, and thanks a donor who gave her vacation money to the Catholic Worker rather than spend it on a trip to Bermuda. Children and animals continued to thrive on the Easton farm while city included a grand neighborhood fiesta. Reminds us that those who appear to be our enemies are still members of The Mystical Body of Christ.

1936 September

"The Mystical Body and Spain" (DDLW #303)
Wants both sides in the Spanish Civil war to cease their fighting since all are Members of the Mystical Body of Christ. Appeals for prayer and reminds us we are to love our enemies.

1936 October

"Day After Day - October 1936" (DDLW #305)
Encourages parents to begin religious education at home. Admires all the hard work of workers and friends. Notes that they "picketed St. Joseph" for their needs.

1936 November

"The Use of Force" (DDLW #306)
Argues that Christians should not take up arms in the Spanish Civil War. Points to Christ, the Apostles, and martyrs whose willingness to suffer led to victory. Opposes the Communist cry to use force. Prays "give us the courage to suffer."


Keywords: pacifism, non-violence.

1936 November

"Day After Day - November 1936" (DDLW #307)
Reflections on our being children of one Father, thanksgiving, the worth of spreading the "Christian revolution" by distributing the Catholic Worker paper, distributing clothes, and other stories of life on Mott Street.

1936 December

"Houses of Hospitality" (DDLW #308)
Enunciates the principles for starting a house of hospitality. Emphasizes starting small and emphasizing Christian principles. "They [Houses of Hospitality] will emphasize personal action, personal responsibility as opposed to political action and state responsibility."

1936 December

"For the New Reader" (DDLW #310)
Restatement of core Catholic Worker beliefs, distinguishing them from Fascism, Communism, and capitalism. Emphasizes voluntary, private, and personal action to improve the social order.

1936 December

"Day After Day - December 1936" (DDLW #433)
Contrasts the joy at the birth of a calf to the coffee line of poor clad and unemployed men. Delights in symphonic music on the radio, Protestant visitors, and letters supporting their work. Expresses gratitude for gifts and St. Joseph, their householder.

1936 December

"Articles on War and Pacifism" (DDLW #563)
Various articles by Dorothy Day on war, pacifism, and the Catholic Worker positions on making peace.

1937 January

"Communists Communicate" (DDLW #313)
The Daily Worker, a Communist daily paper, telegraphs The Catholic Worker asking it to denounce "fascist barbarism." The response protests all war, imperialist, civil, or class, whether fascist or bolshevist.

1937 January

"Day After Day - January 1937" (DDLW #314)
Details about caring for workers during the seamens' strike--the need for large amounts of food, space to sleep, illness, high rent, and the threat of violence. Says unions need a supernatural outlook for "without a fatherhood of God, there can be no brotherhood of man."

1937 February

"They Knew Him In The Breaking of Bread" (DDLW #315)
An appeal for money to support the growing breadlines. Describes the lines, cost of feeding so many, the help they receive, and prayers to St. Joseph. Reminds readers that their gifts put them in Christian solidarity with the breadline and what is done for the men is done for Him.

1937 February

"Day After Day - February 1937" (DDLW #316)
A colorful account of a winter morning at the Easton farm--warm fires and cold bedrooms, making butter, the frolics of Bessie the three month old calf. Speaks of guest rooms, hospitality, starting a Catholic lending library, and reading about cooperatives.

1937 March

"C. W. Editor Calls On G. M. Strikers In Plant at Flint" (DDLW #317)
Supports the sit-down strike as a nonviolent tactic in labor organizing. Describes in detail a visit to strikers against General Motors in Flint, Michigan. Notes Communists take advantage of strikes to promote their philosophy of life and calls for Catholics to become "apostles of labor" to reach the masses.

1937 April

"Open Letter to John Brophy, CIO Director" (DDLW #318)
Urges John Brophey, the C.I.O. trade unions director, to use the technique of sit-down strikes, a nonviolent form of coercion, a means used by Gandhi and an example of pure means advocated by Maritain. "The use of force is unchristian."

1937 April

"Day After Day - April 1937" (DDLW #319)
Describes those who deny Christ in His poor as "atheists indeed." Blames well-off "professing Christians" for repelling those with no religion. Quotes from a pamphlet given to the men in the breadline about Christ being their brother and His poverty.

1937 May

"Day After Day - May 1937" (DDLW #321)
Describes the agrarian life at the Easton, Pennsylvania, farm--plans for the barns, a newborn lamb, and the promise of goats. Tells of stopping in Grand Rapids, Michigan, on her way West.

1937 May

"Open Letter to Father Curran On Technique" (DDLW #320)
Exhorts organizers of an anti-Communist rally to stop inciting hate and violence with inflammatory propaganda. Rather, "Forget the negative idea of "fighting Communism," and concentrate on that of building up the Mystical Body of Christ."

Addressed to the Head of International Catholic Truth Society

1937 June

"Day After Day - June 1937" (DDLW #322)
Describes parish life in a South Side Chicago slum, the beautiful liturgy in a St. Louis, Missouri, convent. Speaks to workers, white and colored, and lauds the teaching and hospital work of a 75 year old priest, Fr. John Lyons.

1937 July

"Who is Guilty of 'Murders' in Chicago?" (DDLW #323)
Blames the press and factory owners for inciting police violence against strikers. Relates the suffering of those beaten to Christ's in the garden of Gethsemene. Says we are all guilty for not protesting. Includes some news from the Easton farm.

1937 August

"House Sounder, Paper Smaller, Line The Same" (DDLW #324)
In the midst of house renovation the bread line continues. Says those who oppose helping the destitute have an "atheistic attitude." Appeals for money and describes their "Little Italy" neighborhood.

1937 September

"Farm Colony Larger, Needs Second Farm" (DDLW #325)
Tales of children at the Easton farm, sleeping under a leaking roof, and recent donations. Tells of their prayers to St. Joseph for money to acquire a nearby farm and to build a chapel.

1937 October

Republic Strikers Still Out/Day After Day (DDLW #906)
Supports strikes but not using violence by strikers or company guards. Quotes Norman Thomas on our violent history. Keywords: non-violence, labor

1937 October

Interview With Murphy (DDLW #885)
An interview with the Governor of Michigan and his role in settling strikes and labor disputes in a non-violent way. Highlights his views on lalw and order, but rejection of force and violence. Notes his membership in the Third Order of Franciscans.

1937 November

"No Regrets,' Mooney Tells C. W. Interviewer" (DDLW #326)
Describes a visit to Tom Mooney who was jailed in 1915 for labor organizing and who spends his days caring for infirm inmates in San Quentin prison. Mooney sees Christ as "a great Leader of the workers who set an example of laying down His life for the poor and dispossessed of this world."

1937 December

"California C. W. Groups Starting Right" (DDLW #327)
Tells of the Catholic Worker houses and projects in Los Angelus and San Francisco. Notes the many priests and bishops involved with labor issues and the need for a philosophy of work.

1937 December

"Look On The Face Of Thy Christ" (DDLW #328)
Reflects on the plight of the men on the breadline and the "natural cheerfulness of the moment." Asks readers to help their work of feeding those who represent Christ.

1937 December

"Letter to the Unemployed" (DDLW #188)
Facing the desperation of the Great Depression with hope is difficult. Reminds us of the common laboring life of Christ and the Holy Family. Religion links us in a brotherhood through Christ and is a battle "unto the pulling down of fortifications."

1938 January

"News from Town and Country" (DDLW #330)
Homey descriptions of life on Mott Street: Christmas gifts received, their needs, a priest who joined the bread line and a wild new year's eve. At the farm, an ice storm creates some adventure and with January comes the peak of winter. Asks prayers for the new year.

1938 January

"Florence Is A Communist" (DDLW #329)
Lauds the courage of a Southern household maid who became a Communist hoping for a better social order. Notes the degradation of cottons workers and prods Catholics to become lay apostles to help build up a new social order.

1938 February

"Of Finances and Personal Initiative" (DDLW #145)
Explains the C.W.'s perpetual necessity to help the poor. Objects when states responsibility impedes personal responsibility. Calls her readers to have a Christ room in their homes, hospices in poor parishes and coffee lines for the transients, in order to exercise personal responsibility.

1938 March

"Valiant Is The Word" (DDLW #332)
Admires the heroic sacrifice and hard work of Iola Ellis in helping her sister's daughters get an education. Advocates educational rights for Negroes so they can become leaders.

1938 March

"Day After Day - More Houses of Hospitality Are Needed" (DDLW #331)
Calls for every parish to have a Works of Mercy Center and for courage in doing the little immediate jobs of feeding the hungry and giving out literature. (Notes St. Therese's "little way.") Encourages discussion groups and round table discussions for the clarification of thought.

1938 March

Chicago Readers (DDLW #907)
Appeals for help at a new house of hospitality in Chicago.

1938 April

"Distinguished Visitors Mark Past Month" (DDLW #333)
Another appeal has gone out entrusting their needs to St. Joseph. Notes how busy everyone is at the office, on the breadline, and on the farm. (Someone had noted the hordes of young men around the CW and wondered what they do.) Mentions that public works such as bridge building can be considered works of mercy.

1938 May

"Detroit C. W. Is Model of Hospitality" (DDLW #334)
Praises the hospitality at the Detroit Catholic Worker and tells of police violence against picketers on strike. Describes a night spent at a bleak Salvation Army shelter.

1938 June

"News of C. W. Groups Given By Editor" (DDLW #335)
A series of stories about the work of Catholic Worker groups she recently visited on a speaking trip: Portsmouth and Newport, RI; Boston and Worchester, MA; Milwaukee; Chicago; Rochester, NY; Detroit; and Pittsburgh.

1938 July

Bills and Things--Day After Day (DDLW #908)
Reports on the current worsening employment conditions in the country, and the concomitant need to send out another appeal for funds, even though it is summer. Gives an account of the communal work on the farm, and the problems of bills and the need for help during the canning season.

1938 September

"Explains CW Stand on Use of Force" (DDLW #216)
Clarifies the Catholic Worker position regarding the war in Spain, opposing violence as a solution. Urges prayer for peace, love instead of violence, and preparation for martyrdom.

1938 September

"C.W. Editor Back from Nova Scotia" (DDLW #146)
Describes her trip to Antigonish, Nova Scotia and her stay with the community. Discusses her meeting with the United Mine Workers and how cooperative stores there have built a spiritual foundation for their material needs distribution. Comments on the community's independence and its inter-dependence on one other.

1938 October

"Visitors Criticism, CIO Convention" (DDLW #336)
Collection of little stories: visitors, helping Tamar with homework, praying to St. Joseph for money, reading Pelle the Conqueror, and attending a CIO convention. Affirms her "faith in the tremendous spiritual capacities of man."

1938 October

"Farming Commune" (DDLW #337)
Relishes the progress of the farm in Easton after two and a half years. Says they are applying "the principles of the personalist and communitarian revolution" and urges unused land owned by the Church be used in imitation of their efforts.

1938 December

"Day After Day - December 1938" (DDLW #338)
Attends a dinner in honor of Raissa Maritain and takes her to a jazz club in Harlem. Compares the Mott Street neighborhood to a village with small shops, sweet smells, generosity, troubles, pets. Asks if someone can send a hedgehog to her daughter.

1939 January

"Day After Day - January 1939" (DDLW #339)
An open letter to Peter Maurin, who is travelling, conveying the latest news from New York--visitors, news of strikes, conversations, and a needs list for the farm. Says their work is for a pluralist order, for the common good seeking concordances with others' points of view.

1939 January

House of Hospitality (DDLW #3)
An account of the first five years of the Catholic Worker (C.W.). Describes the C.W. not simply as a newspaper but as a movement. Explicates its position on labor and unions through Peter Maurin's ideas on personalism. Much of the book, however, is taken up with the day to day experiences of the C.W., describing the soup lines, publication of the paper, picketing, farm communes, and the finances of the C.W.

1939 February

House of Hospitality,
Foreword
(DDLW #435)
An overview of the beginnings of the Catholic Worker. As a journalist covering the Communist led march on Washington in December 1932, Dorothy yearns and prays to find a way to work for the poor and oppressed. She meeets Peter Maurin who "indoctrinates" her in Catholic social teaching and his program to change the social order: starting a newspaper, houses of hospitality, roundtable discussions and farming communes. Includes several of Peter's essays and details about starting the newspaper and their first houses of hospitality.

1939 February

"Complains of Organized Charity, Cops" (DDLW #340)
Describes the ordeal of trying to find a bed for a two and a half year old child on a cold Winter night and the indignity they faced at the hands of the police. Finally, she gives her and her daughter Tamar's beds to the boy and his father.

1939 February

House of Hospitality,
Chapter One
(DDLW #436)
Engaging vignettes about the daily work of the early depression era movement: helping the evicted, street corner speaking, the impersonal shelters run by the city, and the delightful conversation of children around the office.

1939 February

House of Hospitality,
Chapter Two
(DDLW #437)
Vignettes about a mentally ill woman disturbing the neighborhood and the good luck and hard work life of a friend. Describes their struggles with food, lack of money, heated discussions, children's play, "little miracles," selling the paper at a nearby church, and the constant interruptions. Notes two kinds of materialism.

1939 February

House of Hospitality,
Chapter Three
(DDLW #438)
Tales of hospitality, distributing the paper, and propaganda meetings. Affirms the primacy of performing the works of mercy over "talking and writing about the work." Quotes from Frederick Ozanam on putting faith into action. Describes homey scenes at the beach house with Theresa and their beachcomber friend Smiddy. Tells of their poverty and their joy amid their city neighbors, a busy parish Church nearby, and Peter's efforts in Harlem.

1939 February

House of Hospitality,
Chapter Four
(DDLW #439)
A mixture of colorful stories of guests' travails, daily tasks, and small pleasures. Includes a Peter Maurin presentation on Socialism's faults and the need for action based on a supernatural foundation. Reflects on St. Therese's Little Way as a way to overcome discouragement.

1939 February

House of Hospitality,
Chapter Five
(DDLW #440)
Describes the seemingly endless stream of donations, visitors, and people in need that fill the long winter days and make writing difficult. Points to bits of humor and scenes of natural beauty that refresh the soul. Notes their bittersweet good fortune in moving to a larger but less expensive house.

1939 February

House of Hospitality,
Chapter Six
(DDLW #441)
Struggles with discouragement and turns to prayer and spiritual reading for courage. Includes quotes from various spiritual writers. Tales from the farm and trips to the Home Relief Office, swims to escape the oppressive heat, and sweet smells. Rejects the notion that all are not called to perfection and sees true security in giving ones talents in the service of the poor. Details their debt and asserts their insecurity is good.

1939 February

House of Hospitality,
Chapter Seven
(DDLW #442)
Fighting melancholy and overwork she wavers between justifying and blaming herself. Includes a mock dialogue with a "Critical Inquirer," examples of their arguments and conflicts, and sustaining quotes from spiritual writers. Sets a rule of life for herself and affirms that "those circumstances which surround us are the very ones God wills for us."

1939 February

House of Hospitality,
Chapter Eight
(DDLW #443)
After describing their search for a farm and the move to Mott Street, most of the chapter is a clarification of why they support organizing and striking workers. Contrasts their peaceful methods with the communist calls for violence in a class war. Asserts a spiritual foundation based on the dignity of man, a philosophy of labor, and the unity of the Mystical Body of Christ. Wants workers to become owners and lauds the cooperative and back-to-the-land movements.

1939 February

House of Hospitality,
Chapter Nine
(DDLW #444)
A summer full of trips between the Easton farm and the city, she vividly chronicles the flurry of activity that seemingly accomplishes a great deal. Struggles with issues of freedom, personal responsibility, and her role in the movement. Feels "utterly lacking, ineffective."

1939 February

House of Hospitality,
Chapter Ten
(DDLW #445)
Expresses deep gratitude to God for the goodness of their first summer at the Easton farm. Explains why they distribute The Catholic Worker and Catholic literature at Communist rallies. Meditates on the phrase "Our Father" as the basis for understanding that all men are brothers. A long description of their efforts to help the striking seamen in New York.

1939 February

House of Hospitality,
Chapter Eleven
(DDLW #446)
Bucolic description of the antics of Bessie the calf. Much of the chapter describes her visit to the sit-down strike in Flint, Michigan, against General Motors and their tactics. Says labor in the U.S. needs a long range program of education about cooperatives, credit unions, and a philosophy of labor. Quotes from a leaflet distributed to the men on the breadline inviting them to attend a parish mission. After a talk to a women's club in Florida she observes that the rich who deny Christ in His poor "are atheists indeed."

1939 February

House of Hospitality,
Chapter Twelve
(DDLW #447)
Contrasts the violence against strikers in Chicago at the Republic Steel Mills, egged on by the media, with the peaceful methods of dealing with strikers by law enforcement officials in Johnstown, Pennsylvania. Comments on the joyful antics of the many children at the farm in the Summer, and enumerates their many unmet needs at the farm. Describes the noisy rebuilding going on at Mott Street. On the road, she reports on housing efforts in Chicago and a beautiful liturgy in St. Louis, explaining why they say Compline in New York.

1939 February

House of Hospitality,
Chapter Thirteen
(DDLW #448)
On speaking trips to California, Florida, and Alabama, she notes the many places she spoke to labor groups, the projects of many lay people, priests, and sisters, and a visit with the anti-union president of a steel mill. Describes the death and funeral of a seaman who lived at the Catholic Worker. Reiterates the principles of their work: smallness, giving shelter to the homeless, indoctrination, personal responsibility, teaching cooperation and mutual aid, and relying on God--"Unless the Lord build the house, they labor in vain that build it. Recommends several books.

1939 February

House of Hospitality,
Chapter Fourteen
(DDLW #449)
An account of struggling with agencies and suspicious police to find a room for a small child. A reflection of Christ's sufferings, borne for all who suffer now, and the realization that "suffering and death can no longer be victorious." Discusses the problem of dissension and self-criticism in the movement, reproaching herself and her own sinfulness. Notes how hard their work is and that change comes slowly. Asserts that "Love and ever more love is the only solution to every problem that comes up."

1939 February

House of Hospitality,
Conclusion
(DDLW #450)
Reflecting on the themes cover in the book, she acknowledges all that has been accomplished and distinguishes the role of the State and personal responsibility. Enumerates the many strikes they supported. Calls for a greater use of prayer and the desire to be saints. Speaks about what individual workers are doing in New York and is encouraged by houses around the country. Concludes by recalling Peter Maurin's fundamental ideas--voluntary poverty and the works of mercy. Prays that they continue on "the downward path which leads to salvation."

1939 March

"Day After Day - March 1939" (DDLW #341)
Describes a mission being preached in a nearby Church. Feels love for the poor ones in attendance seeing them as brothers of Christ. Explains why she prays for those who have committed suicide. Makes an appeal for funds.

1939 May

"House of Hospitality" (DDLW #342)
A detailed account of the first houses of hospitality in New York where the works of mercy, prayer, work, and community intermingle.

1939 June

"Open Letter to Peter Maurin From Editor" (DDLW #343)
An open letter to Peter Maurin telling him of the latest developments during one of his prolonged absences from the New York area. There were some tragedies--her father and Mr. Breen died and Charlie the bricklayer collapsed. Many members of the team fell ill. Yet there was also joy to share--progress continued on the Easton farm and interest in The Catholic Worker movement grew both at home and abroad. Most importantly, the various workers' children brought amusement and joy into everyone's lives.

1939 July

"About Many Things in N. Y. And on Farm" (DDLW #344)
A collection of "odds and ends of things that happen around the Catholic Worker:" cleaning, weddings and births, the activities of the Mott Street office, CW's correspondence, a day at Maryknoll, the Easton farm, and her plans for some recently donated property on Staten Island. Notes "To live with children around is good for the spirit."

1939 September

"C. W. Retreat" (DDLW #345)
Points to Christ's example of getting away from the multitudes and the importance of finding Him for their work. Notes that a three day silent retreat attended by people from 15 Catholic Worker houses has led to a their renewed sense of strength, unity, and purpose.

1939 September

"Funds Needed To Carry On Work in N. Y." (DDLW #346)
Meditates on the virtues of voluntary poverty and the difference between decent poverty and destitution. Describes their poor circumstances and appeals for money to carry on the work. Also notes that life on Mott Street provides diversion and, sometimes, real joy.

1939 October

"San Gennaro Festa Scene On Mott St." (DDLW #348)
Writes of a time of fasts and feasts--Orthodox Jews observing the Day of Atonement while their Italian neighbors continued to celebrate the Feast of San Gennaro. Tragedy marred the celebration--a drunken fight resulted in the fatal stabbing of a participant. While visiting with her neighbors during the fiesta, she reflects upon the hardships in her neighbors' lives, the acceptance with which they endured their poverty, and the enthusiasm with which they embraced the simple pleasures which came their way.

1939 October

"To The Workers" (DDLW #347)
An impassioned appeal to American workers asking them not to participate in the production of goods which will be used to wage war. She reminds workers of their power and begs them to unite and again sacrifice to further international truth and justice, not mass killing and destruction.

1939 November

"War Plans Taken With Awful Calm" (DDLW #350)
Reports on the growth of C.W., new houses, the newspaper's circulation, and various projects. Assesses the employment situation and the country's willingness to mobilize for war and the making of profit. Expresses gratitude for the people who have answered their appeal and have continued to make the C.W.'s ministry possible. Amidst talk of war and peace " It would be hard to keep a cheerful spirit in the face of the calm acceptance of this preparation for mass slaughter and insanity if it were not for our faith."

1939 November

"Untitled Review of 'A Christian Looks at the Jewish Question'" (DDLW #349)
Reviews Jacques Maritain's book, A Christian Looks at the Jewish Question. Quotes from the book extensively agreeing with his denunciation of anti-Semitism in Europe, a call for better emigration policies, and using "the real power of love and truth even over political and social relations."

Keywords: anti-Semitism, racism, truth, justice

1939 December

"Thanksgiving Dinner and Other Things" (DDLW #351)
Describes their Thanksgiving feast. Despite the fact that donations were sparse, all enjoy a filling, yet sober, celebration. Notes the beginning of Advent and thoughts of feasting turn to fasting. Describes her speaking tour of New England, meditates on the virtues of manual labor, and reminds her readers that the truckmen of Burlington are suffering real privation during their strike.